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World: Logistics Cluster Global ConOps Map (Feb 2018)

Wed, 02/14/2018 - 12:59
Source: Logistics Cluster Country: Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Fiji, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Madagascar, Nigeria, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Tonga, Turkey, Vanuatu, World, Yemen

Haiti: Background Briefing to the Executive Board, 2018, “Operational Response at Country Level: Haiti”

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 21:58
Source: UN Women Country: Haiti

UN-Women’s operational response in Haiti may be of interest to the Board, due to the specific context and scope of its efforts to help bridge serious gender disparities in wellbeing, opportunities, access and control over productive resources, in a country consolidating the rule of law and undergoing a complex socioeconomic transition, against a backdrop of decades of governance and security deficits, further compounded by atypically high levels of vulnerability to natural disasters and changing weather patterns. This note aims to:

(i) share the main strategic thrust and content of UN-Women’s operational response in Haiti;

(ii) explain new approaches and methods used to maximize UN-Women’s relevance and contribution; and

(iii) highlight opportunities for support to women’s empowerment in Haiti.

UN-Women’s country level operational response in Haiti

Following a successful political transition at the beginning of 2017 after a lengthy electoral gridlock, Haiti finds itself at a critical juncture in its medium and long term political, institutional and economic development trajectory, in a setting characterized by an atypically high level of vulnerability to natural disasters and hazards.

Compelling evidence from around the world suggests that women’s empowerment is one of the key pathways to securing the ‘stabilization dividend’. Locking in and consolidating the gains made by Haiti in close collaboration with the international community, will therefore require the sustaining of adequate levels of national and international public investment targeting women’s empowerment, and ensuring that this is done strategically. Three key insights from this evidence have guided UN-Women’s work in Haiti and include:

a) Building the capacity of women to meaningfully participate in decision-making at all levels: we can now quantify the measurable impact of women’s participation in decision-making shaping stabilization processes, which has been shown to lead to a 35% greater chance of sustainable peace over 15 years;

b) Job creation and community-level resilience: investing in women in post-crisis and stabilization settings exponentially increases the investment of families in health, education and the social sector – leading to greater stability and resilience at the community level;

c) Ensuring equal opportunities for women and men to participate in the design and delivery of humanitarian interventions:placing gender equality at the center of planning considerations for humanitarian assistance not only leads to greater impacts for women and girls, but for men and boys and whole communities.

Therefore, integral to achieving Agenda 2030 is the need for sustained and vigorous effo rts, constituting the strategic thrust of UN-Women’s operational response, aimed at: supporting the emergence of gender responsive public institutions and key legal and policy frameworks; closing gender gaps in leadership and access to decision-making and public services; and ensuring equal access between men and women to productive resources.

Since 2016 UN-Women has significantly increased the number of key strategic partnerships with key actors and mobilized donor funding. Prior to this UN-Women faced challenges in optimizing its strategic positioning in the context of the widespread economic and institutional dislocation, resulting from the 2010 earthquake.

An intensive period of strategic re-orientation and re-organization of the programme portfolio in 2017 has now seen a significant ramping up of the scope, scale, impact and implementation capacity of our work. UNWomen’s has subsequently focused on bringing about concrete change in the lives of women and society more broadly through the concentration of evidence based interventions across four impact areas.

1) Gender Responsive Normative and Institutional Frameworks

Low levels of alignment between existing legal and institutional arrangements and the international and regional treatise and conventions to which Haiti is a signatory constitute a serious impediment to the achievement of gender equality. While the passing of key policies and legislation in the last few years present important advances, the public sector continues to struggle with ensuring policy coherence and coordination, undermining efforts to mainstream gender equality at both national and local levels. In addressing this, UNWomen with Canada’s active engagement, has played a key role in the rationalization and scaling up of support targeting the Ministry of Women´s Affairs in its coordination and normative roles, through the development of the Ministry’s first comprehensive capacity development and support plan. UN-Women is currently engaged in efforts supporting the capitalization of this plan.

2) Women’s Political Participation and Electoral Gender Based Violence

Women´s participation in decision-making spaces is extremely low including as voters, evidenced by the 9% turnout by women during 2016 Presidential elections. Following the most recent legislative elections, the rate of women’s representation in the lower chamber rose from 0% to 2.5%, and from 0% to 3.6% in the senate, placing the country, currently ranked 187 of 190 in terms of women’s political participation, among the 7 countries with the lowest rate of participation of women in parliament in the world. Furthermore, while making up almost 30% of the public sector, women hold less than 8% of senior positions. This under representation in the political sphere results from multiple, persistent structural challenges (including discriminatory selection processes for party lists, funding of campaigns and gender-based stereotypes and biases), but stems first and foremost from high levels of Electoral Gender Based Violence (EG BV).
UN-Women played a key role in opening-up national policy dialogue and helped galvanize attention around EGBV, both during the 2016 parliamentary and mayoral and sub-national elections. With the support of Canada, UN-Women provided comprehensive capacity development support to a nationwide consortium of CSO’s and key state actors such as the national police, the national election management body and the justice sector on the prevention, tracking and monitoring of EGBV. UN-Women also supported the strengthening of legal redress mechanisms through the provision of free legal aid for targeted candidates. Local level trends augur well for Haiti’s future-prospects in the area of women’s political participation, whereby in spite of low numbers of women elected at the national level, Haiti recorded a record number of women mayors and vicemayors, registering at over 30% and comparing very favorably with sub-region and beyond.

3) Violence Against Women and Girls and Access to Justice

Pervasive gender-based violence against women and girls (VAWG) represents the most severe manifestation of discrimination in the country. This spiked following the 2010 earthquake and ha s not returned to pre-quake levels, following the slow, staggered and uneven pace of recovery that has affected all parts of society. A growing number of major initiatives to prevent and address VAWG have been undertaken . In 2017, UN-Women with the support of the Netherlands, supported the Development of Haiti’s landmark ten -year National Plan to Combat Gender-Based Violence and has been key in supporting the creation of an Office to Combat Violence Against Women and Girls. Nevertheless, there is still no legislation criminalizing violence against women, including domestic violence, sexual violence, incest, marital rape and sexual harassment.

Institutional capacities related to both the prevention and response to VAWG, including the implementation of laws, policies and programs are sorely lacking. Under the auspices of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), UN-Women, alongside UNDP and UNICEF designed and implemented the first phase of a Joint Rule of Law Programme implemented in 2016 and focusing on strengthening the prevention related capacities and responsiveness of the justice sector to VAWG; the capacities of the national police service and the corrections system, while facilitating the access to justice for survivors of gender based violence. In little more than a year of implementation, UN-Women contributed to important achievements paving the way for improving the prevention and access to justice by survivors of VAWG. UN-Women worked with over 100 human rights and women’s rights focused CSO’s in strengthening their capacities in the areas of administration of justice, and supported more than 30 civic organizations to respond to the specific needs of female prisoners, through psycho-social support, life skills training and vocational education.

4) Women’s Economic Empowerment: Job Creation, Early Recovery and Resilience

Gender gaps in Haiti around the access, control and management of productive resources, in both the agricultural sector and the commercialization and management of utilities, such as energy or water, is pervasive and widespread. Haiti currently ranks 138th out of the 155 countries surveyed in the Gender Inequality Index (GII), helping place the extent of these disparities into context. The emergence of women farmers engaging in commercial agriculture and women entrepreneurs engaged in utilities management faces multiple gender specific barriers related to their access to skills, information, ICT solutions, finance and access to national and global supply chains and markets. In 2017 UN-Women, in collaboration with Haiti’s official vocational skills accreditation body supported one of Haiti’s largest CSO’s to establish and manage a farmer demonstration school in one of Haiti’s ten territorial subdivisions located in Western Haiti. The facility saw i ts first cohort of 250 women and men farmers graduate, following an intensive 4-month certification course in modern climate resilient agricultural farming practices. Negotiations are currently underway with international partners to replicate this facility in Haiti’s 9 remaining territorial sub-divisions.

In the area of utilities management, UN-Women in collaboration with UNEP and with support from Norway are currently developing a joint programme that will leverage innovation and ICT’s to strengthen the resilience of rural Haitian women in the coastal areas of Southern Haiti most prone to climate-related shocks. The programme will aim to reduce-dependency on humanitarian assistance, by increasing their revenue from the management and commercialization and their access to clean water and energy. This will be done in such a way as to reinforce and complement ongoing initiatives targeting the promotion of selected green value chains, as a means of fostering integrated area-based economic development.

UN-Women along with IOM, OCHA and UNDP work in close coordination to support the implementation of Haiti’s national disaster risk reduction strategy. UN-Women ensures that the specific needs of women and girls are taken into account at the strategic, institutional and operational levels of disaster risk response planning. In terms of disaster response, following Hurricane Matthew in October 2016, UN-Women with support from Sweden and CERF funds directly supported more than 11,000 women and girls in the worst affected areas, through a network of women’s organizations. Beneficiaries were provided with tools, materials, safe spaces and cash for work, enabling them to actively participate and lead in community-level early recovery and longer-term resilience related efforts. UN-Women also helped develop the institutional capacities of women’s organizations to effectively participate and lead in the design and delivery of community-level humanitarian response.

Partnerships

UN-Women has established itself as a key partner in the promotion of gender equality and wome n’s empowerment in Haiti with a broad range of national, civic, bi and multilateral, NGO, private sector, media and UN system actors. Through these partnerships UN-Women has been able to advance core elements of its operational, normative and coordination mandate in Haiti, as outlined in earlier sections. Building on this, UNWomen has successfully provided the impetus for the consolidation and formation of new intra and intersectoral coalitions and alliances, that have come to serve as ‘force multipliers’ for mandate implementation.

Within the international cooperation space for example, UN-Women in early 2017 led the establishment of Haiti’s first donor coordination group on gender, in close collaboration with Switzerland and Canada. This has been instrumental in helping map, track, rationalize and build on synergies in existing and planned international support. Furthermore, UN-Women plays a key role in supporting Haiti’s Ministry of Women´s Affairs in its outreach efforts targeting key stakeholders, for the purpose of fostering new partnerships, examples including the UN-Women initiated ‘High-Level National Gender and Infrastructure Round Table’, held in 2016.

UN-Women’s programmes in Haiti through which these partnerships have been cemented, have been made possible through the generous financial, material and political support from donors and partners including:

Haiti, Canada, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. Additional support is being sought to continue and expand our work across the sectors outlined in this note, with an emphasis on women’s economic and political participation. Both being critical enablers in ensuring that the aspirations of both Haiti and its international partners to see it become an emerging country by 2030 are met.

Haiti: Haïti : Plan d'élimination du choléra - Développement du moyen terme, juillet 2016-décembre 2018

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 20:32
Source: World Health Organization, UN Children's Fund, Pan American Health Organization, Government of Haiti Country: Haiti

RÉSUMÉ

La phase II ou moyen terme du Plan National d'Elimination du Choléra (PNEC) en Haïti, prévue sur la période de juillet 2016 à décembre 2018, s'intègre pleinement dans le plan initial écrit en 2012 et correspond donc à la vision du Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Population dans l'objectif d'éliminer le choléra avant 2022.

La mise en œuvre du PNEC à partir de 2013, après deux premières années d'épidémie lors desquelles la transmission duVibrio cholerae restait inégalée dans le monde, a permis d'atteindre à la fin de l'année 2015, le premier objectif qui était une incidence nationale inférieure à 0,5%. Cependant, le plan initial par manque d'expérience de gestion d'une telle épidémie et écrit dans un contexte d'urgence absolue, a montré quelques limites notamment dans sa capacité à mobiliser et réunir l'ensemble des moyens financiers nécessaires à l'exécution de la lutte alors prévue. Au-delà de l'élimination du choléra, ce plan initial indique la volonté du développement de secteurs complets dans les domaines de la santé ou encore de l'accès à l'eau et l'assainissement,avecdesobjectifs sansdoute peu réalisablespourla période considérée.

Dans un deuxième temps et afin d'opérationnaliser le plan initial, était écrit le plan d'élimination dans sa phase I ou court terme qui lui aussi montrait les mêmes limites, bien que déjà nettement plus réalisable. Le plan phase II ou moyen terme décrit dans ce document et écrit donc quasiment six ans après l'introduction du choléra en Haïti répond à la volonté commune d'éliminer le choléra en Haïti, et se veut :

• Cohérent avec la vision du Ministère de la Santé Publique décrite dans le plan initial afin de le rendre pleinement opérationnel ;

• Réaliste au regard des capacités à réaliser les activités, dans l'objectif d'atteindre les résultats visés et propices à une élimination du choléra ;

• Basé sur l'expérience et les leçons apprises de chacune des parties prenantes dans la lutte contre le choléra ;

• Evaluable avec un plan de pilotage intégré ;

• Efficient et concentré autour d'activités et de zones cruciales, pour réduire fortement l'incidence de la maladie d'ici fin 2018. Ainsi en tenant compte des expériences passées, cette phase est budgétée à 178,220,115 USD contre 1,2 Milliards USD dans le plan initial.

Enfin considérant que l'objectif d'élimination avant 2022 demeure inchangé, l'objectif spécifique dans cette phase est donc d'atteindre moins de 0,1% d'incidence sur le territoire national d'ici fin 2018.
L'analyse de l'épidémie, depuis la phase court terme du plan d'élimination, nous indique l'existence de zones de persistances et de diffusion de l'épidémie pouvant être décrites selon plusieurs critères. Ainsi dans cette prochaine période de lutte, un accent particulier sera mis sur celles-ci, avec une surveillance renforcée, un travail important sur la qualité de l'eau de consommation en premier lieu, sur la protection des systèmes contre la contamination fécale, et sur l'amélioration de la gestion des excrétas en second lieu.

Les activités de promotion de la santé seront particulièrement renforcées dans ces zones de persistance.

D'autre part, la mise en œuvre de projets pilotes associant vaccination et chloration à domicile a montré des résultats notables sur le contrôle local des foyers épidémiques. Ainsi cette phase sera l'occasion de la mise en œuvre d'une campagne de vaccination à plus large échelle dans les départements du Centre et de l'Artibonite qui continuent à jouer un rôle majeur dans la dynamique nationale de l'épidémie. Le suivi de ces activités par le comité de vaccination permettra d'étudier l'impact des interventions avant leur élargissement à l'échelle nationale.

La stratégie d'alerte et de réponses rapides prend ici toute sa place puisqu'étant la seule activité harmonisée au niveau national, impliquant pleinement le MSPP, la DINEPA et les partenaires internationaux, dont le rôle dans le contrôle de la maladie depuis trois années semble crucial au vu des conditions de vulnérabilité peu améliorées au niveau national.

World: United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) Missions in 2017

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:24
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Chile, Dominica, Haiti, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Madagascar, Mexico, Peru, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Sint Maarten (The Netherlands), Turks and Caicos Islands, World

The United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) team is part of the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and the international emergency response system for sudden-onset emergencies. UNDAC was created in 1993. It is designed to help the United Nations and governments of disaster-affected countries during the first phase of a sudden-onset emergency. UNDAC, as a tool of OCHA, also assists in the coordination of incoming international relief at national level and/or at the site of the emergency.

In 2018, the UNDAC team will celebrate its 25th year anniversary highlighting UNDAC’s invaluable role in sudden-onset emergencies over the course of its history. It’s the year to celebrate the contribution of all the members from all the regions, particularly national disaster management experts that are part of the UNDAC roster and who remain strongly committed and actively engaged in the UNDAC system.

World: Building back better restores hope

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 08:07
Source: UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction Country: Haiti, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal, Philippines, World

By Denis McClean

KUALA LUMPUR, 12 February 2018 - Just five months after the September earthquakes which completely destroyed 60,000 homes, more than 30,000 have been rebuilt by affected families provided with cash and technical assistance from the Mexican authorities.

In a first for Mexico, the authorities restored hope to affected communities across seven states, by issuing a total of 170,000 debit cards which allowed each family to draw up to US$8,000 to rebuild or repair their homes, in the first such experiment by the Mexican government.

Jorge Wolpert, Director General, de la Comisión Nacional de Vivienda (CONAVI) speaking yesterday at the World Urban Forum, said the authorities were taken by surprise at the progress of the recovery which focused on providing low-cost earthquake-resilient housing to low-income families.

“It was not something we were envisioning five months ago and the reason for the success is that we entrusted people and accompanied them on the way,” he said.

Similar stories of encouraging community engagement and participation in building back better were shared from the Philippines in the wake of typhoon Haiyan, Nepal (2015 earthquake), Haiti (2010 earthquake), Iran (2017 earthquake) and Mozambique (2017 Cyclone Dineo) in a Special Session on Restoring Hope: Building back cities and communities together after a disaster.

In his keynote address to the Special Session, UNISDR head, Robert Glasser said: “Population growth and economic development means that more people are in harm’s way than 50 years ago in earthquake zones, flood plains, coastlines and dry lands increasing the risk that a natural hazard can become a catastrophe.

“The vulnerability gap in deprived urban areas will only grow if we do not ensure that the priorities for action of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction become embedded in risk governance at the level of both national and local government.

“The Sendai Framework is the global plan for reducing disaster losses adopted in 2015 after three years of exhaustive consultations. Three years later we are now at the point of ensuring that there is a global surge in the adoption of national and local strategies for disaster risk reduction which will make a real difference to the lives of people living in harm’s way.”

Mr. Glasser said there has to be recognition "that when disaster strikes we need to be ready with plans already in place for the reconstruction and rehabilitation phase so that what was lost can be built back better for the future benefit of the disaster-affected community.

"The opportunity to build back better is an opportunity not just to prevent loss of life but to restore a community’s morale and to integrate disaster risk reduction measures into daily civic life."

Dr. Farzin Fardanesh, Urban Development and Regeneration Corporation (UDRC), I.R. Iran, highlighted the approach taken by the Iranian authorities following the devastating Iran-Iraq earthquake. While funds were provided to affected families from the disaster which damaged or destroyed 40,000 homes in rural and urban areas, the Housing Foundation also provided trained masons for hire by the affected population who worked together to rebuild the homes to earthquake-resilient standards.

The session overall served to highlight the linkages between SDG11 focused on resilient cities and communities, the Sendai Framework and the New Urban Agenda which all support efforts to build back better in the wake of a disaster and to reduce the number of future deaths and number of people affected, by 2030.

World: Christian Aid statement on sexual harassment claims in the sector

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 08:00
Source: Christian Aid Country: Haiti, World

Outlining its policy on dealing with claims of sexual harassment, Christian Aid said:

In the past 12 months, Christian Aid has investigated two incidences of sexual misconduct – both of which occurred overseas. One investigation led to the dismissal of a staff member, while the other case resulted in disciplinary action (not dismissal). In both cases, no laws were broken: however, the staff members involved did not live up to the standards and expectations outlined in our code of conduct. One of the instances was a case of failings in adequate safeguarding, which was reported to the Charity Commission.

Christian Aid is a signatory to sector-wide codes of conduct. We also have a range of established policies and procedures aimed at preventing sexual harassment committed by any individual representing Christian Aid (including staff, volunteers and consultants) against other staff, beneficiaries or anyone else.

We continuously review and refresh our current policies and practices, to ensure that we take timely and corrective actions to prevent and censure such behaviour, ensuring we have confidential and robust mechanisms that enable and support our workforce, beneficiaries and stakeholders to report concerns and incidents without fear or favour, and to ensure protection and support for individuals who report or have experienced such incidents.

Across Christian Aid we continue to work with colleagues to ensure a better (and shared) understanding of what sexual harassment is, and the zero-tolerance culture we expect – including by training staff across the global organisation on the organisation’s code of conduct.

We are engaging with The Churches Child Protection Advisory Service, who are reviewing our safeguarding policies and will be undertaking safeguarding training for managers.

Commenting on reports of misconduct by nine Oxfam staff in Haiti, in 2011, Christian Aid said:

We are saddened by the accounts of deplorable behaviour from a group of individuals who have abused their power, exploited their position, and sought to subvert systems designed to protect vulnerable people in Haiti. Through their unacceptable actions, they have undermined the vital, effective and life-changing work carried out by Oxfam, as well as by other aid and humanitarian organisations worldwide.

Christian Aid takes the issue very seriously. We are committed to ensuring that such behaviour is not tolerated either within our organisation or across the aid sector. We agree that further investigations are needed within the sector.

Many aid agencies have procedures covering safeguarding, whistleblowing and misconduct – collectively, we must work harder to ensure they are fit for purpose, to root out improper conduct. It is imperative that we are transparent and accountable, both to the communities where we work and to those who trust us to spend their money to alleviate suffering overseas.

Responding to reports that staff who left Oxfam in Haiti later joined other aid agencies, without their knowledge of the incidents, Christian Aid said:

Christian Aid always follows robust recruitment procedures, such as securing references from legitimate sources, conducting Disclosure and Barring Services (DBS) checks where we are permitted to do so, and carrying out Counter Terrorism checks where required. If any issues arise during recruitment processes – through DBS, references, whistleblowing or even a verbal comment – we would always investigate and take appropriate action.

As part of our selection process, all employment contracts are subject to two satisfactory references, including one from a current employer. We request work email addresses and telephone numbers of each referee; we require them to submit reference forms attached to a covering letter on company-headed paper, sent from a work email address.

In cases where a referee has left the organisation, a HR name for that organisation will be required, so contact can be made to ensure the referee was employed by them and to ascertain suitability to provide the reference. Basic information would also be sought from the HR Department to confirm dates of employment and reason for leaving.

Like all employers, we are not legally permitted to force job applicants to reveal their spent convictions. And whilst we are not legally required to disclose information on why former Christian Aid employees have left the organisation, we always aim to provide factual information when asked. (At the same time, we have a duty to work within the legal framework of data protection, and we apply the British legal standard across our global organisation.)

We are committed to living out our values of respect and dignity for all, and we will investigate any claims about any individuals involved in the Haiti incident to ascertain the facts, should they relate to Christian Aid and should we receive further information.

Notes to Editors:

  1. Christian Aid works in some of the world’s poorest communities in around 40 countries at any one time. We act where there is great need, regardless of religion, helping people to live a full life, free from poverty. We provide urgent, practical and effective assistance in tackling the root causes of poverty as well as its effects.

  2. Christian Aid’s core belief is that the world can and must be changed so that poverty is ended: this is what we stand for. Everything we do is about ending poverty and injustice: swiftly, effectively, sustainably. Our strategy document Partnership for Change explains how we set about this task.

  3. Christian Aid is a member of ACT Alliance, a global coalition of more than 130 churches and church-related organisations that work together in humanitarian assistance, advocacy and development.

  4. Follow Christian Aid’s newswire on Twitter.

  5. For more information about the work of Christian Aid, visit www.christianaid.org.uk

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: UK threatens to cut off aid cash to charities after Oxfam sex report

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 05:17
Source: Reuters - Thomson Reuters Foundation Country: Chad, Haiti, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

LONDON, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Britain will cut off aid funding from any organisation that does not comply with a new review into charities work overseas, aid minister Penny Mordaunt said on Sunday, describing reports of sexual exploitation in the sector as "utterly despicable".

Read more on the Thomson Reuters Foundation

Haiti: Oxfam’s reaction to recent news on sexual misconduct in Haiti and Chad

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 04:42
Source: Oxfam Country: Chad, Haiti

In 2011 some members of Oxfam Great Britain staff in Haiti acted in a way that was totally unacceptable and is the most appalling mark against the high values we set ourselves at Oxfam.  On the recent allegations of sexual misconduct in 2006 in Chad, Oxfam is shocked and dismayed. While Oxfam Great Britain cannot corroborate the information on Chad at the moment it highlights again unacceptable behaviour by a small number of people and the need for a sector-wide approach to tackle the problem.

Oxfam's priority is to stand fully by the survivors of such reprehensible behavior - and to ensure that such behavior is absolutely rooted out of our organisation. We stand firmly against the exploitation and abuse of women and girls.

In Haiti, as soon as Oxfam Great Britain became aware of the allegations Oxfam immediately launched an internal investigation.

Oxfam’s primary aim was always to formally investigate and take action against those involved and we publicly announced, including to media, both the investigation and the action we took as a result.  Four members of Oxfam Great Britain staff were dismissed as a result of the investigation and three, including the country director, resigned before the end of the investigation. Allegations that underage girls may have been involved were not proven.     Oxfam Great Britain has not and would not provide a positive reference for any of those that were dismissed or resigned as a result of the case in Haiti. Unfortunately, there is nothing Oxfam can do to stop individuals falsifying references, or former or current Oxfam staff that worked with the individual providing a reference in a personal capacity.

That these events took place seven and twelve years ago respectively and involved a small number of Oxfam Great Britain staff is no cause for complacency for any Oxfam.

Globally, we in Oxfam, know we must do more to continue to change our own culture and to create the strongest possible policies to prevent harassment and protect people we work with around the world. We are doing that now with all our effort.   Since the Haiti case in 2011 we have introduced a range of measures to prevent sexual abuse and misconduct happening in the first place and improve how we handle any allegations. We have a Global Taskforce on Prevention of Sexual Harassment, Exploitation & Abuse that is co-chaired by our Oxfam International Executive Director, Winnie Byanyima.   We want to use this opportunity to reiterate that our confidential global 'whistleblowing' line is available to all Oxfam staff and all the people we work with, wherever we work. We know the only way to change culture and make the safeguarding system work is to be open and transparent about it.   We hope we can rebuild our trust with our supporters around the world who know, as we do, that the actions of a few do not represent all that Oxfam stands for.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: Statement from International Development Secretary on Oxfam and UK action to tackle sexual exploitation in the aid sector

Mon, 02/12/2018 - 00:00
Source: Department for International Development Country: Haiti, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Penny Mordaunt has announced a series of actions to tackle sexual exploitation in the aid sector, declaring it vital that the whole sector steps up.

Published 12 February 2018 From: Department for International Development and The Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt MP

A statement from International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt:

“This morning I met with Mark Goldring, Chief Executive of Oxfam, and Caroline Thomson, Oxfam Chair of Trustees.

“Oxfam made a full and unqualified apology – to me, and to the people of Britain and Haiti - for the appalling behaviour of some of their staff in Haiti in 2011, and for the wider failings of their organisation’s response to it.

“They spoke of the deep sense of disgrace and shame that they and their organisation feel about what has happened, and set out the actions they will now take to put things right and prevent such horrific abuses happening in future. They did not inform the Department for International Development at the time that this case involved sexual misconduct or beneficiaries.

“Oxfam assured me they are cooperating fully with the authorities in Haiti and will do so in any other country where abuse has been exposed. Because the perpetrators in Haiti were not British nationals, Oxfam has - at my request - also today committed to immediately provide full details of those involved to the governments of their home countries, so that appropriate legal processes can be taken forward.

“But assurances are not enough so I have asked them to confirm to DFID by the end of the week precisely how they will handle any forthcoming allegations around safeguarding - historic or live - in a way in which the public can have confidence. We expect this process to include an independent and external element of scrutiny.

“I told Oxfam they must now demonstrate the moral leadership necessary to address this scandal, rebuild the trust of the British public, their staff and the people they aim to help, and deliver progress on these assurances. It is on the basis of their actions going forward – rather than of their commitments in one meeting today - that I and others will judge them. I was clear that part of an organisation’s moral leadership comes from individuals taking responsibility for their actions.

“I have today also met with the Chief Executive of the Charity Commission for England and Wales, Helen Stephenson, who informed me that the Commission urgently requested full and frank disclosure of what happened in 2011 from Oxfam and they are considering their next regulatory steps.

“But the Charity Commission and I agree that it is not only Oxfam that must improve and reach the high standards of safeguarding we require. Right across the charitable sector, organisations need to show leadership, examine their systems, ensure they have clear whistleblowing policies and deal with historical allegations with confidence and trust.

“My absolute priority is to keep the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people safe from harm. In the 21st century, it is utterly despicable that sexual exploitation and abuse continues to exist in the aid sector.

“I am determined that we do our utmost to prevent exploitation and abuse happening - and ensure that where it does happen it is identified and dealt with appropriately. We cannot wait for others to act – the UK must show leadership ourselves and that is why today I am taking action.

“At their best, UK charities do extraordinary work around the world, saving and transforming lives. It is vital now that the whole sector steps up and demonstrates the leadership that the public expects.

“Firstly, I have issued a letter to all UK charities working overseas – including Oxfam - to demand that they step up and do more, so that we have absolute assurance that the moral leadership, the systems, the culture and the transparency that are needed to fully protect vulnerable people are in place, all of the time, and wherever these charities work and with whichever partners they work with. I have also requested that they confirm they have referred any and all concerns they may have on specific safeguarding cases and individuals to the relevant authorities. In requesting this, we are using Charity Commission guidance and will continue to work closely with them. We will shortly commence a similar exercise with our non-UK partners. If anyone has specific allegations, I urge them to contact our Counter Fraud and Whistleblowing Unit.

“Secondly, my department has today created a new unit to urgently review safeguarding across all parts of the aid sector to ensure everything is being done to protect people from harm, including sexual exploitation and abuse.

“This unit will be wide-ranging and comprehensive in its remit, looking at safeguarding across UK and international charities, suppliers, and the UN and multilateral organisations so that together we can make progress. This will look at how to guard against criminal and predatory individuals being re-employed by charities and abusing again, including the option of establishing a global register of development workers.

“I will bring in independent experts to advise myself and this unit on this work. This builds on the changes we have made to introduce tough sanctions for human rights abuses including sexual exploitation for all new contracts with suppliers and new training for DFID staff to identify and respond to any concerns. I have asked for a meeting with the NCA, the Foreign Office, the Ministry of Defence and others to discuss how to make further progress.

“Thirdly, I am going to step up our work to tackle sexual exploitation and abuse across the UN and other international organisations. Already, the UK is working with the UN Secretary-General Guterres to stop abuses under the UN flag and we have introduced specific clauses in our funding agreements with a number of UN agencies to take every action possible to prevent all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse and take robust and prompt action in response to any allegations.

“Fourthly, the Charity Commission and DFID will co-host a safeguarding summit before the end of the month with the aid sector and alongside UK counterparts, where we will agree a set of actions to strengthen safeguarding processes and mechanisms, including around staffing and recruitment, paving the way for a series of events throughout the year. We will also work with the Commission to provide technical assistance and support to other nations that wish to improve the standard and regulations of safeguarding.

“Lastly, I will take this tough message to the international community - and call for action from them. Later this week I will make a speech in Stockholm and firmly demand that all donors and development organisations show leadership and take action alongside the UK.

“Whatever the complications and pressures organisations face, the people we are here to serve must be the number one priority. I remain very clear: we will not work with any organisation that does not live up to the high standards on safeguarding and protection that we require.”

Haiti: Haiti - Humanitarian Response Plan 2017–2018

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 17:09
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Haiti

to assist
461 000 people

FAO requires
USD 22 million

period
January – December 2018

Haiti remains affected by a convergence of humanitarian crises exacerbated by the impact of Hurricane Matthew (2016) and to a lesser extent Hurricanes Irma and Maria (2017), which have severely disrupted food production, impacting overall food security.

Objectives

FAO is working with partners in the Food Security Cluster to:

• Strengthen affected people’s resilience through timely life-saving assistance, protection, improved access to basic services and immediate livelihood restoration.

• Ensure access to food for the most affected populations.

• Improve the nutritional status of malnourished children under five and pregnant and lactating women in the community-based programmes.

• Increase food security through improved livelihoods and agricultural production.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update September 2017- United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 14:49
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

United Nations-Coordinated Appeals

  • As of 30 September, United Nations-coordinated appeals (Humanitarian Response Plans,
    Refugee Response Plans and flash appeals) within the Global Humanitarian Overview require US$24.2 billion to meet the humanitarian needs of 104.1 million crisis-affected people in 39 countries. The appeals are funded at $10.4 billion, leaving a shortfall of $13.8 billion.

  • In September, Hurricanes Irma and Maria caused untold devastation across the Caribbean. A three-month Regional Response Plan for the Caribbean was launched on 15 September seeking $27.1 million to cover the urgent needs of the most vulnerable people in the region’s most-impacted nations, territories and states. The plan has received $2.6 million in reported funding to date, though some of the over $20 million in funding for the region will probably apply to the plan. The Cuba Plan of Action requesting $55.1 million was launched on 19 September and is currently funded at $8.8 million. On 29 September, a Flash Appeal for Dominica was launched requesting $31.1 million to respond to the urgent needs of 65,000 people affected by Hurricane Maria.

  • In Bangladesh, as of 28 September, more than half a million Rohingya refugees had fled across the border from Myanmar in just over a month. Partners in Bangladesh released a revised response plan targeting 1.2 million people for assistance, including new refugees, previous refugees and host communities, over six months; its requirements are $434 million. (The Cuba Plan of Action, the Regional Response Plan for the Caribbean and the Preliminary Response Plan for the refugees and host communities in Bangladesh are currently not counted as part of the Global Humanitarian Overview.)

  • In Libya, $75 million is urgently needed to provide 900,000 people with life-saving assistance in healthcare, civilian protection and basic services. Gaps are particularly serious in the health sector: more than 50% of Libyan health facilities are either partially or not at all functional. In Ukraine, with the harsh winter imminent, critical additional support is needed to ensure that winterisation needs of affected people along the contact line are met. The Humanitarian Response Plan which seeks $204 million remains underfunded at just 25%. Please see icons overleaf for information on urgent funding needs in Bangladesh, CAR, Chad, DRC, Libya, oPt, Somalia, Sudan and Ukraine.

  • As of 30 September, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has approved $339 million for 32 countries. In September, the fund allocated $27 million to 5 emergencies, including $8 million for immediate response to people affected by Hurricane Irma in Cuba.

  • The fund allocated $7 million to humanitarian partners in Bangladesh to assist hundreds of thousands of refugees arriving from Myanmar (In addition $12 million was allocated in early October). CERF also approved $7 million for Nepal and Bangladesh for life-saving support to the flood-affected population. For underfunded emergencies, CERF approved $5 million in September out of the $45 million set aside for the second round of the 2017 underfundedemergency allocations; the remaining $40 million is currently under review. For 2017, 43 donors have contributed a total of $359.3 million to CERF, and eight other donors have pledged $93.7 million. CERF is projecting an income of $453.9 million for 2017, nearly $4 million over the current $450 million funding target.

  • As of end September, 26 donors have contributed $571 million (including $86.5 million in pledges) to the 18 country-based pooled funds active in 2017. Over 500 humanitarian partners have received a combined $408 million from the funds, and another $77.4 million is pending approval. The funds with the largest volumes of allocations are those in Yemen ($59.4 million), Iraq ($55.6 million) and Ethiopia ($52.6 million). Some 45% of allocations has gone to international NGOs, 32% to UN organizations, 22% to national NGOs and 1% to Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement organizations. Real-time information on CBPF contributions and allocations is available on http://gms.unocha.org/bi.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update August 2017- United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 14:45
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

United Nations Coordinated Appeals

  • As of 31 August, United Nations coordinated appeals and refugee response plans within the Global Humanitarian Overview require US$24.1 billion to meet the humanitarian needs of 102.3 million crisis-affected people in 38 countries. The appeals are funded at $9.1 billion, leaving a shortfall of $15.0 billion. Revised appeals for Mali, Yemen and Niger this month increased overall requirements.

  • The security situation has deteriorated sharply in Mali in recent months: clashes between armed groups are further exacerbating community vulnerability, displacing people-- over 30,000 people have been displaced in 2017 -- and consequently generating new humanitarian needs. The 2017 HRP has been revised to address increasing requirements for immediate food assistance; approximately 3.8 million people are suffering from food insecurity in 2017, up from 3 million people during the same period last year. To date, only 26 percent of the $304.7 million in funding requirements has been received. Additional funding for the 2017 HRP is urgently required to ensure that the most vulnerable Malians receive the life-saving assistance they desperately need, and to mitigate the risk that the crisis, and its impact on neighbouring countries, will deepen.

  • The revised 2017 response plan for Yemen issued this month includes changes in targets and requirements which are now at $2.3 billion. The Integrated Cholera Response component has been added to the YHRP and funding will be tracked as a subset of the YHRP as progress is made in 2017. In addition to the original YHRP target covering 8.3 million people through WASH assistance, some 6.7 million more people will be reached through a nationwide cholera awareness campaign, including household-level awareness-raising and provision of soap and oral rehydration salts. However, since this is a one-time provision of assistance, the overall YHRP target will remain at 12 million people. A total of $254 million is required to implement action outlined in the integrated cholera response plan to control the outbreak, prevent further spread, and minimize the risk of recurrence. Please click on icon overleaf for information on urgent funding needs in DPRK, DRC, CAR, Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia, Haiti, and Ukraine.

  • As of end August, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has approved approximately $312 million for 30 countries. In August, the fund allocated $35.2 million to six emergencies, including $4 million for the Gaza strip to ensure the provision of life-saving health services and avoid an outbreak of water-borne and water-related diseases. CERF allocated $600,000 to Yemen to support urgent airlift of medical and WASH equipment to curb the spread and impact of cholera in the country. CERF approved some $6.5 million for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to minimize the humanitarian impact of the recent drought and to prevent the death of infants, children under five and pregnant and lactating women from preventable causes. In north-east Nigeria, almost $10 million was approved to complement food assistance through the provision of integrated life-saving WASH, health and nutrition interventions focusing on newly arrived IDPs and returnees in the same areas facing famine-like conditions. As of 28 August, 41 donors have contributed a total of $358.9 million to CERF, and 6 other donors pledged approximately $16.3 million, bringing the total pledged contributions to $375.2 million. Based on estimates from past contribution patterns, CERF is projecting an income of $447.5 million for 2017.

  • As of end August, 25 donors have contributed $494 million (including $79.7 million in pledges) to the 18 country-based pooled funds active in 2017. Humanitarian partners have received $384 million with another $24.4 million pending approval. The highest amounts have been allocated by funds in Yemen ($59.4 million), Iraq ($55.6 million) and South Sudan ($45.8 million). Some 46 per cent has gone to international NGOs, 31 per cent to UN organizations, 22 per cent to national NGOs and 1 per cent to Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement organizations. Real-time information on CBPF contributions and allocations is available on http://gms.unocha.org/bi.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update July 2017- United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 14:40
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

United Nations Coordinated Appeals

  • As of 31 July, United Nations Coordinated Appeals and Refugee Response Plans within the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$23.5 billion to meet the humanitarian needs of 102.3 million crisis-affected people in 38 countries. The appeals are funded at $8.1 billion, leaving a shortfall of $15.4 billion.

  • On 3 July, a $25.2 million appeal was launched to address the urgent medical, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and food security needs of 600,000 people in Gaza impacted by the acute energy crisis which began there in April 2017. On 17 July, UN agencies and humanitarian partners in the Republic of Congo launched a humanitarian response plan requiring $23.7 million to help 138,000 people suffering the repercussions of violence and insecurity in the Pool region. Urgent funding is required to save lives, in particular to address food security and nutrition needs.

  • A series of landslides in Bangladesh led the in-country Humanitarian Coordination Task Team to issue a Response Plan requiring $10 million to provide life-saving assistance, reduce vulnerabilities and strengthen public services for the benefit of 51,000 people over the next six months.

  • In Ukraine, the deteriorating humanitarian situation is triggering increased needs. It will be important to prepare vulnerable people in Ukraine for the coming winter. In Haiti, at heightened risk from the Atlantic hurricane season, 2.4 million people countrywide are factored in to the Humanitarian Response Plan to receive protection, early recovery and other humanitarian aid.

  • In Yemen, an estimated 20.7 million people now require some form of aid – a 10 per cent increase since October 2016. As of 25 July, more than 400,000 suspected cholera cases and nearly 1,900 associated deaths had been reported, while 17 million people were food insecure – a 21 per cent leap since last year. In spite of the desperate situation, as of 25 July partners had received only 43 per cent of total financial requirements for the 2017 Yemen Humanitarian Response Plan (YHRP). Please see icon overleaf for information on urgent funding needs in CAR, Chad, DPRK, DRC, Haiti, Myanmar, oPt, Republic of Congo, Sudan, Ukraine and Yemen.

  • As at the end of July, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has approved $274.7 million for 28 countries. In July the fund allocated $8.5 million to four emergencies, including $2 million to Myanmar to assist people affected by Cyclone Mora, in addition to $1 million for people impacted by the recent deadly landslides in Bangladesh. CERF approved some $2.5 million for the Philippines to prevent the outbreak of communicable and water-borne diseases following the Marawi conflict. In Sudan $3 million of a total $5 million application has been approved for swift reduction in acute malnutrition and mortality in children under age five in newly accessible areas of the Jebel Marra region of Darfur. Forty donors have contributed $347.4 million to the fund thus far in 2017, and an additional contribution of $89.2 million is expected by year-end.

  • As of end July, 23 donors have contributed $477 million (including $110.9 million in pledges) to the 18 country-based pooled funds (CBPFs) active in 2017. Humanitarian partners have received $315 million with another $37.7 million pending approval. The highest amounts have been allocated by Funds in Yemen ($59.4 million), Iraq ($55.5 million) and Ethiopia ($36.6 million). Some 50 per cent has gone to international NGOs, 27 per cent to UN organizations, 22 per cent to national NGOs and 1 per cent to Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement organizations. Real-time information on CBPF contributions and allocations is available on http://gms.unocha.org/bi

World: Humanitarian Funding Update June 2017- United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 14:35
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

United Nations Coordinated Appeals

  • As of 30 June, United Nations-coordinated appeals and refugee response plans making up the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$23.5 billion to meet the humanitarian needs of 101.2 million crisis-affected people in 37 countries. The appeals are funded at $7.0 billion, leaving a shortfall of $16.5 billion.

  • Urgent funding is required to enable the UN and partners to deliver timely live-saving assistance. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, violent conflict in the Kasai region has displaced 1.3 million people over the last eight months. The Kasai Flash Appeal, requesting $64.5 million for six months, continues to be critically underfunded. In Mali, funding is urgently required for key elements in the 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan, which has only received 24% of the $293 million required.

  • In the occupied Palestinian territory, an internal dispute has caused an acute energy crisis in Gaza since April 2017. A $25.2 million appeal to address urgent medical, WASH and food security needs of two million people in Gaza was launched on 3 July. Please see icon overleaf for information on urgent funding needs in Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, the occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, Sudan, Ukraine and Yemen.

  • According to reports to FTS as at 3O June, the top-funded appeals by percentage covered are the Niger HRP at 54%, South Sudan at 51%, Iraq at 43%, Burundi at 42% and Myanmar at 40%. In contrast, the five least-funded response plans are Djibouti at 16%, the Peru flash appeal at 16%, Chad at 15% and Senegal at 10.7%. The Burundi Refugee Response Plan is only 5% funded.

  • The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has approved $266 million for 27 countries, including a disbursement of $10.5 million for Angola in response to the refugee influx from DRC and $4 million for immediate assistance to flood-affected people in Sri Lanka. CERF allocated $37 million more in rapid-response grants to be disbursed by 30 June, exceeding its historical average for the same period due to high demands. CERF income in 2016 was lower than expected at $422 million, short of the minimum $450 million annual target, and income this year to date has not closed the gap. As a result, the second round of 2017 underfunded emergencies allocations has been delayed and rapid-response allocations reduced to comport with available cash. New and additional contributions this year will be critical.

  • As of end June, 23 donors have contributed $387 million (including $113 million in pledges) to the 18 active country-based pooled funds (CBPFs) in 2017, and CBPFs have allocated $253 million to humanitarian partners: 49% to international NGOs, 28% to UN organizations, 22% to national NGOs and 1% to Red Cross / Red Crescent Movement organizations. Another $74 million of project proposals are being reviewed across the funds, including $10 million towards the first Nigeria allocation. Real-time information on CBPF contributions and allocations is available on http://gms.unocha.org/bi.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update May 2017- United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 14:30
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

United Nations Coordinated Appeals

  • As of 31 May, United Nations Coordinated Appeals and Refugee Response Plans within the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$23.5 billion to meet the humanitarian needs of 101.2 million crisis-affected people in 37 countries. The appeals are funded at $5.7 billion, leaving a shortfall of $17.8 billion. This represents an additional $900 million and higher coverage as compared to the same time last year.

  • Needs and financial requirements have increased in May due to a revision of the Somalia Humanitarian Response Plan 2017 which increased by 80 percent from $864 million to $1.51 billion. Funding has reached $539 million, which is 35.8 percent. The famine risk in Somalia is now elevated due to severe food gaps, high acute malnutrition and high disease burden. About 6.7 million people are now in need of assistance, up from 6.2 million in January. About 1.4 million children are expected to be malnourished this year including 275,000 who will be severely malnourished and need urgent medical treatment.

  • In Afghanistan, the Taliban announced the start of their annual Spring Offensive “Operation Mansouri” on 28 April. Conflict and security incidents are already intensifying and are expected to lead to further displacement. Over 103,000 people have been newly internally displaced so far in 2017.Please see icon overleaf for information on urgent funding needs in Afghanistan, Haiti, Ukraine, DPRK, Myanmar,
    Somalia, Madagascar and Mozambique.

  • As reported to FTS at 31 May, the top funded appeals by percentage coverage are the Niger HRP at 51.4 per cent, South Sudan at 46.7 per cent, Somalia at 35.8 per cent, Burundi at 35.4 percent, and Madagascar FA at 35.2 percent. In contrast, the five least funded response plans are Sudan at 10 per cent, Senegal at 10.7 per cent, Chad at 12.2 percent, Djibouti at 14.2 per cent, and Ukraine at 14.4 per cent. To note, the Burundi RRP is only 5.1 per cent funded.

  • The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) approved nearly $249 million for 25 countries in 2017 so far. This includes $118 million for famine prevention in north-east Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, making CERF among the fifth largest funding source. CERF released a $22 million loan to FAO to scale up famine prevention in Somalia. In May, CERF disbursed $25 million to Yemen, of which WHO received $3.5 million to support urgent health activities, including cholera. For 2017, 32 donors have contributed a total of $286 million to CERF, and approximately $47 million remain as pledges. CERF projects an estimated funding shortfall of $39 million.

  • As of end May, 20 donors contributed a total of $306 million (including $78 million in pledges) to the 18 active country-based pooled funds (CBPFs) for 2017. More than $137 million has already been allocated to humanitarian partners. Of that amount, 51 per cent went to international NGOs, 26 per cent to UN organizations, 21 per cent directly to local and national NGOs, and 2 per cent to Red Cross/ Red Crescent Movement organizations. Another $104 million worth of project proposals are currently being reviewed across the funds, including $42 million for Iraq and $19 million for Syria through the Syria and Turkey CBPFs. Real-time information on CBPF contributions and allocations is available on http://gms.unocha.org/bi

World: Humanitarian Funding Update April 2017- United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 14:23
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

United Nations Coordinated Appeals

  • As of 30 April, United Nations Coordinated Appeals and Refugee Response Plans within the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$23.0 billion to meet the humanitarian needs of 99.3 million crisis-affected people in 37 countries. The appeals are funded at $4.2 billion, leaving a shortfall of $18.8 billion.

  • Needs and financial requirements have increased this month due to the release of the Flash Appeal for Peru requesting $38.3 million, and an increase in the response plan for the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for the Kasai region through a Flash Appeal, requiring an increase of $64.6 million to respond to the urgent needs of 731,000 people. This brings the overall funding requirement for the DRC in 2017 to $812.6 million. Some 3.7 million persons are internally displaced in the DRC, the highest number in Africa.

  • Since military operations in west Mosul, Iraq started in late February,421,000 people have been displaced, with around 6,000 people fleeing on average per day. If sufficient funding is not urgently secured, emergency food assistance for civilians in and around Mosul may be disrupted.

  • The highly prioritised 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP)for Iraq, appealing for $985 million to assist 6.2 million people, is currently 20 percent funded. For Libya, despite a modest financial requirement of $15 1million, only 13 percent of the HRP requirements are funded.Requirements are particularly urgent in the health sector,with more than 50 percent of Libyan health facilities either partially or not at all functional.Please see icon overleaf for information on urgent funding needs in Iraq, Libya, DPRK, CAR, Chad, Mali, Nigeria and SouthSudan.

  • More than 20 million people in Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen are experiencing famine or a credible risk thereof. To avert a humanitarian catastrophe in the four countries, humanitarian operations urgently require $4.4 billion for life-saving assistance in the key areas of food security, health, nutrition, and water, sanitation and hygiene. Donors have reported more than $1.26 billion; 29 percent of the requirements of the priorities in the four response plans. Overall, more than $2.04 billion has been contributed/committed ($1.84 billion) or pledged ($198 million) for the four countries.

- Two high-level events took place in April providing an opportunity for donors to affirm and pledge support. The Supporting the Future of Syria and the Region: Brussels Conference was held on 5 April.

A total of $6 billion for 2017 was announced, and $3.7 billion for 2018 and beyond. The Yemen High-Level Pledging Event held in Geneva on 25 April announced $1.1 billion towards the crisis in Yemen, with over 72 Member States in attendance.

  • Funding for the Flash Appeals (FA) for Kenya, Madagascar and Mozambique increased in April. The Madagascar FA is currently 64 percent funded ($12.9M), the Kenya FA is 29 percent funded ($48.1M), and the Mozambique FA is 21.6 percent funded ($2.2M). The Peru FA is currently 13.6 percent funded.

  • The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has approved nearly $200 million for 20 countries in 2017 thus far, including over $70 million for famine prevention in north-east Nigeria, Somalia and South Sudan. In addition, CERF has set aside $25 million for rapid scale-up of emergency food and nutrition assistance and other vital services in Yemen. As of end-April, CERF is currently the fourth largest source of funding for the famine response in the four countries in or on the brink of famine. For 2017, 30 donors have contributed a total of $284 million to CERF, and approximately $54 million remain as pledges. CERF is projecting an estimated funding shortfall of $40 million from the annual target of $450 million for this year.

  • As of end April, 17 donors contributed a total of $236 million (including some $72 million in pledges) to the 18 active country-based pooled funds (CBPFs) for 2017. More than $64 million has already been allocated to humanitarian partners, including $23 million in Somalia and $18 million in Ethiopia. Of that amount, 51 percent went to international NGOs, 29 percent to UN organizations, and 19 percent directly to local and national NGOs.

  • Another $95 million worth of project proposals are currently being reviewed across the funds. Real-time information on CBPF contributions and allocations is available on http://gms.unocha.org/bi

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary February 9 - 15, 2018

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 01:14
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, South Africa, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Rainfall expected to provide some relief to Zimbabwe and Mozambique, elsewhere dryness continues

Africa Weather Hazards

  1. Since November, rainfall has been belowaverage in South Africa.
    Significant moisture deficits have strengthened and expanded into several parts of Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Zambia, Namibia, and southern Angola.

  2. Although rainfall has increased in some areas of Madagascar since mid-November, the negative impacts of the delayed onset of the rainfall season is still present.
    Rainfall is below average in several western provinces of the island.

  3. Below-average rain during the past month has resulted in large moisture deficits and below-average vegetation conditions in northwestern Angola.

Haiti: Haiti: Humanitarian Funding Overview (as of 7 February 2018)

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 00:34
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Haiti

World: $1.06 billion needed to fight back against hunger in 26 countries

Thu, 02/08/2018 - 22:27
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen

With conflict and climate-related shocks sending global hunger numbers marching back up after declining for decades, FAO is asking for $1.06 billion to save lives and livelihoods and address acute hunger in 26 countries.

With donor support, FAO is hoping to reach 30+ million people who rely on agriculture for their livelihoods via a range of interventions that seek to rapidly restore local food production and enhance nutrition. These include, for example, providing seeds, tools and other materials for crop farming, safeguarding livestock through lifesaving veterinary care, organizing trainings in improved production, processing, and land and water management, and giving at-need families cash so they can immediately access food.

Escalating humanitarian needs are largely the result of the persistence, intensification and spread of violence and conflict – the impacts of which are often being amplified and aggravated by climate-related shocks. "The reality is that while the lives of millions of people were saved thank to rapid humanitarian response in 2017, millions more remain on the very edge of starvation. Maintaining food production and rebuilding agriculture are fundamental to preventing loss of life from severe hunger and to providing a pathway towards resilience in the midst of humanitarian crises," said Dominique Burgeon, Director of FAO's Emergency and Rehabilitation Division and Leader of FAO's Strategic Programme on Resilience.

"This is why FAO focuses on transforming vulnerability into resilience - so that when something bad happens families are better able to cope and feed themselves, people don't have to sell off their assets or flee, and communities can rebuild more quickly after the crisis passes," he added.

Key needs

FAO's 2018 humanitarian appeal focuses on assisting crisis-hit, vulnerable people in 26 of the world's most food insecure countries.

These include Yemen, the country with the largest overall number of people in acute food insecurity, where the Organization aims to reach 5.7 million people. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, FAO plans to assist almost 2.8 million people. In South Sudan, 3.9 million people will benefit from emergency livelihoods support. In Syria, where three-quarters of rural families continue to produce their own food, FAO will provide 2.3 million people with the means to do so. And in Somalia, the Organization will assist 2.7 million people facing severe hunger.

(To see what other countries FAO is targeting for assistance and to learn more about the Organization's planned humanitarian activities in 2018, click here.

A firewall against famine

The latest UN report on global hunger found that after years of steady declines, the ranks of the malnourished are once again on the rise and now totals a troubling 815 million people.

Continued conflict in Iraq, South Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic and Yemen and other places as well as new outbreaks of violence in the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Myanmar have played a major role in driving hunger up. In the Caribbean, hurricanes Irma and Maria left lives – and livelihoods – in tatters, while in the Horn of Africa ongoing drought has taken a heavy toll. Across all of Africa, the Fall Armyworm pest is threatening the crops of millions of farmers.

Last year, discouraging trends like these saw famine - widespread death resulting from severe hunger – break out in parts of one country, South Sudan, and emerge as a real risk in three others: Yemen, Somalia, and northeastern Nigeria.

Famine was contained in South Sudan and averted in the other three at-risk countries thanks to a massive response by the humanitarian community on multiple fronts – including large- large-scale support to agricultural and pastoral communities that played a key role in tilting the balance away from the worst-case scenario.

Highlights of FAO interventions undertaken as part of this joint effort:

  • Provision of seeds, equipment, fertilizer, and training that enabled some six million people in Nigeria, Somali, South Sudan and Yemen to plant and harvest crops.

  • 43 million animals in the same four countries – mainly cattle, goats, and camel – received veterinary care, feed and water thanks to FAO, allowing millions of pastoralist and livestock-dependent families to feed themselves and remain self-sufficient.

  • Some 2 million poor, high-vulnerable families benefitted from FAO cash transfers (adding up to $42 million in total). These payments helped people avoid selling off household seeds, animals or other assets to buy food and bought them time and breathing room to resume their own agricultural production.

    Click here for a complete overview of FAO's work in 2017 to respond to food crises and build rural resilience.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update January 2018 - United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Wed, 02/07/2018 - 17:07
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Total requirements: $23.18 B

People in need: 137.0 M

People to receive aid: 94.0 M

Countries affected: 26

  • In January, five humanitarian response plans outlined in the GHO 2018 were officially launched: these were for the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Somalia and Yemen. A special alert announcing immediate humanitarian requirements for Ethiopia was also issued to complement the Government-UN Humanitarian Requirements Document (HRD), as was a plan highlighting the humanitarian needs due to drought in Mauritania.

  • As at 1 February 2018, UN-coordinated Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria 3RP Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan aim to meet the humanitarian needs of 94 million crisis-affected people in 26 countries. The number of people to receive aid has risen from 90.9 million in December 2017 to 94 million at the end of January 2018. This is mainly because needs are higher than anticipated in Haiti, Yemen and the Syria region.

  • The HRPs and Syria 3RP require US$23.18 billion to meet these humanitarian needs. The $655 million increase in requirements since publication of the GHO on 1 December 2017 can chiefly be attributed to the 3RP Regional Refugee & Resilience Plan for Syria and the HRP for Yemen. On the other hand, financial requirements for Cameroon, Chad, DRC, Haiti, Somalia and South Sudan are now lower than anticipated.

  • According to FTS, appeals were funded at $377.8 million or 2.2% of requirements on 1 February 2018. The substantial shortfall against requirements of $16.56 billion are due to limited reporting to FTS so early in the year. For real time updates on incoming funds, see https://fts.unocha.org/

  • The deteriorating humanitarian situation in the DRC over the last year has left 13.1 million people in need of humanitarian protection and assistance, more than double the number for 2017. In the past year more than 1.9 million people have been displaced in the country, bringing the total number of IDPs to 4.3 million. Some 7.7 million people are severely food insecure and the country is host to more than 500,000 refugees from neighbouring countries.

  • Since April 2017, internal Palestinian dynamics have contributed to a decline in the situation in the Gaza Strip, occupied Palestinian territory. The signing of the Palestinian reconciliation agreement in October 2017 has not led to an improved humanitarian situation. At the heart of the decline is an aggravation of Gaza’s longstanding electricity crisis, which is affecting all of Gaza’s two million residents. The acting HC for the oPt has warned that emergency fuel for critical facilities in Gaza will become exhausted by mid-February, and has called for urgent donor support to avoid a humanitarian catastrophe driven by the energy crisis. In 2018, $6.5 million is required for the UN to provide 7.7 million litres of fuel to run backup generators and vehicles that would ensure a minimum level of life-saving health, water and sanitation services.

  • The Somalia HRP is once again driven by the imperative of famine prevention. The threat of famine has declined but needs remain high: some 2.7 million of the 5.4 million people in need require life-saving support. Since the beginning of January 2017, over 1.2 million people have been displaced, bringing the overall number of displaced people to above 2.1 million. Malnutrition rates remain among the highest in the world with nearly 301,000 children under the age of five acutely malnourished and 48,000 children struggling with life-threatening, severe malnutrition. Life-saving assistance will be vital to sustain last year’s important gains and accomplish ground work for investment in longer-term development.

  • In January, the UN Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) provided the largest-ever single allocation of $50 million to scale up urgent life-saving assistance in Yemen. This allocation will complement the Yemen Humanitarian Fund based on the prioritization of activities led by the Humanitarian Coordinator. In addition, CERF allocated $4.2 million to Myanmar to cover life-saving interventions for 94,611 crisis-affected people in the northern part of Rakhine State over six months, and $6.5 million to assist 25,000 highly vulnerable people with critical needs and ensure safe transit to the new refugee settlement site in Mantapala, Zambia. Thus far, ten donors have contributed a total of $7.2 million to CERF for 2018, and 28 other donors have pledged an additional $379 million.

  • Country-based pooled funds (CBPF) received over $100 million in contributions in December 2017, another $10 million in January 2018 and a further $114 million in pledges, ensuring continuity at the beginning of the year. Early availability of funds enabled the Afghanistan CBPF to launch a $20 million allocation to kick-start implementation of the country’s new HRP and position supplies in advance of the flooding season. Meanwhile, the Sudan Humanitarian Fund has made $3 million available to partners for the refugee response in White Nile state, and for the prevention of acute watery diarrhea outbreaks.

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