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World: CrisisWatch December 2017

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 20:10
Source: International Crisis Group Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, China - Taiwan Province, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United States of America, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

Global Overview DECEMBER 2017

Huthi rebels in Yemen killed their erstwhile ally, former President Saleh, and cracked down on his party, while both the Huthis and the Saudi-led coalition looked set to increase hostilities in January. In Syria, the regime and its allies ramped up their campaign to take territory from jihadist and other rebel groups in the north west, and the de facto leader in Libya’s east disavowed the 2015 political deal, which could lead to more fighting in coming weeks. In Egypt, the military intensified operations in North Sinai against jihadists, who in turn launched more attacks. President Trump’s declaration that the U.S. recognises Jerusalem as Israel’s capital triggered deadly clashes between Palestinian protestors and Israeli security forces, and in Iran over a dozen were reported killed as tens of thousands protested against the regime. In Africa, Cameroon and Ethiopia experienced heightened instability, new fighting in South Sudan could escalate in January, and a ban on unrestricted grazing in Nigeria’s Taraba state could lead to more violence between herders and farmers. In Central America, the political crisis in Honduras saw deadly clashes between opposition supporters and police.

Guatemala: América Central y el Caribe Boletín de Precios, diciembre 2017

Mon, 01/01/2018 - 14:55
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama

La Red de sistemas de alerta temprana contra la hambruna (FEWS NET, por sus siglas en inglés) monitorea las tendencias de los precios de los alimentos básicos en los países que son vulnerables a la inseguridad alimentaria. Para cada país y región en la que opera FEWS NET, el Boletín de Precios proporciona una serie de gráficos que muestra los precios mensuales en el año de comercialización en curso, en determinados centros urbanos, y permite que los usuarios comparen las tendencias actuales con los precios del promedio de cinco años, los indicativos de las tendencias estacionales y los precios del último año.

Los principales alimentos básicos que se producen y consumen en la mayor parte de Centroamérica y el Caribe son maíz, arroz y frijol. Este último constituye una fuente importante de proteína para los hogares pobres. En Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras y Nicaragua, los favoritos son el maíz blanco, que se consume principalmente en forma de tortillas, y el frijol rojo o negro, mientras que en Costa Rica y Panamá el arroz es el que domina en producción y consumo. En Haití, los alimentos básicos son el arroz, frijol negro, y maíz.

En Centroamérica, normalmente hay dos estaciones de cultivo: la Primera (de abril a septiembre) durante la cual se produce principalmente el maíz, y la Postrera (de agosto a diciembre) durante la cual domina la producción de frijol. La temporada de Apante (de noviembre a marzo) es una tercera temporada de cultivo, durante la cual se produce frijol en el centro-sur de Nicaragua, en el norte de Guatemala y en el norte de Honduras.

En Haití, existen varias temporadas de cultivo. El maíz se produce durante la temporada de Primavera (de abril a septiembre). El frijol negro se produce en más de dos temporadas en las áreas húmedas y montañosas de Haití. La primera temporada se lleva a cabo de marzo a mayo y la segunda de julio a octubre. El frijol también se produce en las áreas con irrigación y montañosas húmedas del país durante la tercera temporada (en otoño) de diciembre a enero.

El maíz blanco y el frijol son comúnmente objeto de comercio entre Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, y Costa Rica en Centroamérica.

El mercado de San Salvador en El Salvador se considera el mercado regional más importante para estos alimentos básicos y se encuentra bien integrado con el resto de la región. Debido a los altos niveles de intercambio comercial, mantiene relaciones tanto con los mercados regionales como con los internacionales. Otros centros comerciales importantes son Ciudad de Guatemala (Guatemala), San Pedro Sula y Tegucigalpa (Honduras), Chontales y Managua (Nicaragua), San José (Costa Rica), y Ciudad de Panamá (Panamá). La República Dominicana es la fuente principal para la importación de maíz, frijol y tubérculos de Haití. Haití depende en gran medida de los Estados Unidos para la importación de arroz, que representa cerca del 80 por ciento de sus necesidades de consumo.

Costa Rica: Costa Rica and Panama: Population Movement: Emergency Appeal Final Report

Sun, 12/31/2017 - 18:38
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Brazil, Burkina Faso, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Mali, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Senegal

A. Situation Analysis

Description of the Situation

In November 2015, a group of more than 1,000 Cuban nationals were reported in the border area between Costa Rica and Panama in the community of Paso Canoas, Corredores Canton. Since these people did not meet the migration requirements to enter Costa Rica, a significant build-up of migrants occurred on the Panamanian side of the border as they began to settle in the streets, waiting on a solution to their legal immigration status.

The solution for these Cuban citizens arrived several months later when an airlift was organized so that they could bypass Costa Rica and travel directly to El Salvador; however, considering the diverse needs detected from the first few days of this intervention until its conclusion, the Costa Rican Red Cross was determined to provide humanitarian assistance to this group, which in turn inspired other government institutions, churches and organized communities to join them. Working together, these disparate organizations opened 37collecitve centres, met food, water and sanitation needs, provided health services and the national government organised and funded the airlifts, benefiting an estimated of 8,000 people.

The National Emergency Commission reported that there was a total of 5,800 Cuban migrants who received emergency accommodation, 43 temporary collective centres were established, 33 communities hosted the migrants, 15 Municipal Emergency Committees were activated, more than 500 volunteers participated and funds equal to the amount of USD $5 million were allocated for operational and administrative maintenance in the first phase of the operation (Nov 2015 – April 2016); however, the total number of Cubans registered in collective centres that received assistance from the Government of Costa Rica and the Costa Rican Red Cross totalled 6,180, according to data provided by the Costa Rican General Directorate of Migration and Immigration in mid-April 2016.

Following the departure of almost all the Cubans in March 2016, a group of Haitians and people from different countries outside of the Americas (mostly of African origin) were reported in the border zone with Panama; the African migrants came from Burkina Faso, Congo, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Senegal and Somalia, among others. Once again, a build-up of people began to occur in the streets of the border community due to Costa Rica’s visa requirements, which meant they were not allowed to enter Costa Rica and the Panamanian authorities would not allow them to legally re-enter Panama. The migrants who managed to evade the police began to gather in different zones along the Costa Rican border with Nicaragua, specifically in the Peñas Blancas sector, which had equally unsuitable conditions in terms of shelter, drinking water, food and hygiene, and so forth.

On Tuesday, 12 April 2016, these migrants were forcibly returned in transport provided by the Ministry of Public Security to the border with Panama in Paso Canoas, which began to increase this problem given the precarious conditions that the migrants were experiencing and the number of people detained at this point. To address this situation, several institutions agreed to establish a "humanitarian care post" to evaluate the migrants’ health conditions and support their basic food and hygiene requirements; the Costa Rican Red Cross later administered and operated this post.

The country's immigration authority established a temporary detention centre where approximately 1,380 irregular migrants in the country were accommodated while their immigration status was resolved. It is important to note that this occurred while the Nicaraguan police and members of the national army maintained a heavy presence along the country’s border with Costa Rica to prevent these migrants from entering the country.

From April to June 2016, a humanitarian care post was established in Paso Canoas, which was managed by the Costa Rican Red Cross, the Migration Office and public security agencies; in this post, the CRRC provided assistance in the form of first aid, food and hygiene (showers and sanitary cabins) to meet the basic needs of migrants in transit. However, this place did not provide enough humanitarian assistance to meet the demand. In addition to this post, there was a second site in the Buenos Aires sector of Puntarenas, where attention was provided to individuals or family groups travelling with children. In La Cruz de Guanacaste, two collective centres were operational during the crisis: El Jobo and Las Vueltas; both had the capacity to accommodate about 150 migrants each. However, the daily population varied widely, ranging from 80 migrants in the morning and increasing to 200 migrants in the evening, which was largely because most migrants used the people smuggling networks at night / dawn to continue their journey.

In addition, an area of land along the border known as Deldú was made available to the migrants, which was administrated by the Costa Rican government to maintain order. Due to the proximity of this area with the border, facilities were installed including potable water, sanitary cabins and a communal kitchen (an area that was used by migrants to charge their cell phones). In addition, three large sun-shades were installed. All these initiatives, which the Costa Rican government led and funded, were implemented to avoid an increase in tension between migrants and residents in the area and not to establish the site as a collective centre; nevertheless, up to 4,000 migrants were registered as living at this site.

Panama also faced a rapid build-up of Cuban migrants in May 2016, when the Costa Rican government stopped issuing transit visas to migrants, which forced 4,000 migrants to congregate in Paso Canoas, where they lived in hotels, apartments and houses; this situation continued until late June 2016, when migrants began to catch flights out of the country or identified informal routes to travel across the remaining Central American countries.

From the beginning of July 2016 to the end of the operation, the Costa Rican Red Cross administered two Migrant Assistance Posts in coordination with the CNE, the Migration Office, public security agencies and the Costa Rican Social Security Institute services (CCSS); one of the centres was at Km 20, Río Claro de Puntarenas, which is in the southern part of the country, and it served a fluctuating population of 300 people. The second centre, called La Cruz de Guanacaste was in El Cruce a Santa Cecilia, which is in northern Costa Rica; these aid posts provided temporary accommodation, food, first aid assistance, transport to medical centres, a supply of clean water and hygiene items, as well as psychosocial support (PSS).

From November 2015 to the first week in July 2016, the CRRC attended:

• Period of Cuban migration: 6,180 migrants

• Period of extra-continental migrants and others: 19,763 migrants

At the end of July 2016, Colombian media outlets observed a rise in the number of migrants concentrated in the Urabá Antioqueño and Chocó areas of Colombia, which are near Panama’s Darién province. Moreover, while only 35 Haitian migrants were registered by Colombian migration authorities in July 2015, a year later the number of Haitian migrants had increased significantly, surpassing the total of Cuban migrants registered months before. Though the Panamanian government had declared its borders as closed by May 2016, it permitted a controlled entry and exit of migrants. By August 2016, thousands of migrants were en route to North America; many of them having started their journeys in Brazil and later travelling through Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala and Mexico.

Panamanian authorities established a migrant’s reception centre in Nicanor for those entering Panama from Las Blancas, Peñitas or Yaviza on the Colombian-Panamanian border. The entry of migrants at the Colombian-Panamanian border increased in October 2016; per health authorities, an average of 300 to 500 migrants entered Panama per day, and around 100 migrants per day left this point by bus provided by the Panamanian authorities, from where they were transported directly to the border with Costa Rica. This meant a serious accumulation of migrants, which overwhelmed the temporary reception centre in Nicanor’s capacities, especially since the migrants’ average stay in Nicanor was 4 to 6 weeks.

It is important to note that due to Hurricane Otto, the number of migrants registered in Panama and Costa Rica in the Darién and Paso Canoas areas in December 2016 decreased significantly from 120 to 50 people a day to approximately 150 people per week.

Haiti: Haïti Bulletin des Prix - décembre 2017

Sun, 12/31/2017 - 03:15
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Haiti

Le Réseau de systèmes d’alerte précoce contre la famine (FEWS NET) surveille les tendances des prix des aliments de base dans les pays vulnérables à l'insécurité alimentaire. Pour chaque pays et chaque région couvert par FEWS NET, le Bulletin des prix fournit un ensemble de graphiques indiquant les prix mensuels de l’année commerciale en cours pour certains centres urbains, et permettant à l’utilisateur de comparer les tendances actuelles à la fois aux moyennes quinquennales, qui indiquent les tendances saisonnières, et aux prix de l'année précédente.

Le riz, les haricots noirs, le maïs et l’huile de cuisson sont les produits alimentaires les plus importants pour les ménages pauvres et à revenus moyens d'Haïti. Les racines et tubercules sont aussi importantes, mais leurs prix ne sont pas suivis pour le moment. Toute l’huile de cuisson est importée et les importations de riz représentent près de quatre-vingts pour cent des besoins nationaux. De grandes quantités de haricots et de maïs sont également importées, mais plus de la moitié des besoins nationaux sont produits sur place. Le riz est consommé par les ménages mêmes les plus pauvres et le riz importé est généralement moins cher que le riz produit localement. Croix-deBossales est le marché le plus important du pays et se trouve à Port-au-Prince, où vit un tiers de la population. Hinche, au centre du pays, est située dans l’une des régions les plus vulnérables. Jérémie est le marché le plus éloigné de Port-au-Prince et Jacmel se trouve dans le département du sud-est, un département particulièrement exposé aux cyclones et qui affiche les taux de malnutrition les plus élevés du pays.

Haiti: Haiti Price Bulletin, December 2017

Sun, 12/31/2017 - 03:10
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Haiti

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

Rice, black beans, maize, and cooking oil are among the most important food items for poor and middle income households in Haiti. Roots and tubers are also important, but not currently monitored. All cooking oil is imported and rice imports account for about 80 percent of national needs. Large quantities of beans and maize are also imported, but over half of the national needs are domestically produced. Rice is consumed by even the poorest households, and imported rice is generally cheaper than locally produced rice. Croix de Bossales is the largest market in the country and is located in Port au Prince, where one-third of the country’s population lives. Hinche, in the center of the country, is located in one of the most vulnerable areas. Jeremie is the farthest market from Port au Prince and Jacmel is located in the Southeast department, a department particularly exposed to cyclones and known for having the highest rates of malnutrition in the country.

Guatemala: Central America and Caribbean Price Bulletin, December 2017

Sat, 12/30/2017 - 23:56
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

The main staple foods produced and consumed throughout most of Central America and the Caribbean are maize, rice, and beans; the latter constituting a key source of protein for poor households. In Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua white maize, mostly consumed in the form of tortillas, and red or black beans are preferred, while in Costa Rica and Panama rice dominates in production and consumption. In Haiti, the primary staples are rice, black beans, and maize.

In Central America, there are typically two main growing seasons: the Primera (April-September) during which maize is primarily produced, and the Postrera (August-December) during which bean production dominates. The Apante season (November-March) is a third growing season during which beans are produced in south-central Nicaragua, northern Guatemala, and northern Honduras. In Haiti, there are several growing seasons. Maize is produced during the Primavera season (April-September). Black beans are produced over two seasons in Haiti’s humid and mountainous areas. The first season spans from March to May and the second from July to October. Beans are also produced in the country’s irrigated and humid mountainous areas during a third, fall season from December to January.

White maize and beans are commonly traded between Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica in Central America. The market in San Salvador in El Salvador is considered the most important regional market for these staple foods and is well integrated with the rest of the region; due to the high levels of commercial exchange it hosts both with regional and international markets. Other important trade hubs include Guatemala City (Guatemala), San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa (Honduras), Chontales and Managua (Nicaragua), San Jose (Costa Rica) and Panama City (Panama). The Dominican Republic is Haiti’s main source for imported maize, beans, and tubers. Haiti relies heavily on the United States for rice imports, for about 80 percent of consumption needs.

Dominican Republic: Actualización epidemiológica - Cólera - 28 de diciembre de 2017

Sat, 12/30/2017 - 20:45
Source: World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization Country: Dominican Republic, Haiti

Cólera en las Américas – Resumen de la situación

En la Región de las Américas, entre las semanas epidemiológicas (SE) 1 y SE 50 de 2017 se notificaron 13.582 casos sospechosos de cólera en La Española; 99% de los cuales ocurrieron en Haití (13.468 casos; incluidas 157 defunciones).

Si bien en ambos países se observó una disminución de casos respecto a lo notificado en 2016, la República Dominicana registró la mayor variación disminuyendo de 12,8 a 1,21 casos por cien mil habitantes mientras que en Haití la variación fue de 3,74 a 1,10 casos por cien mil habitantes en 2016 y 2017, respectivamente.

En Haití, los casos notificados entre la SE 1 y la SE 50 de 2017 (13.468) representan una disminución del 68% respecto al total de casos notificados desde la SE 1 a la SE 52 de 2016 (41.421) y es el número de casos más bajo registrado desde el inicio del brote en octubre de 2010 (Figura 1).
Aún así, se notifican 200-300 casos sospechosos cada semana. En la SE 47 y la SE 50, se informaron casos sospechosos en 7 de los 10 departamentos, aunque cuatro departamentos (Artibonite, Centre, Nord Ouest y Ouest) concentraron el 90% de los casos. El promedio de casos notificados en este periodo superó a lo observado en semanas anteriores, principalmente a expensas de los departamentos Nord y Nord Ouest donde se observó un aumento de 36% y 19%, respectivamente.

De manera similar, comparativamente entre 2016 y 2017 el número de defunciones relacionadas con el cólera disminuyó en 65% (de 447 a 157 defunciones) y el número de defunciones notificados en 2017, corresponde a la cifra más baja registrada desde 2010.

En la República Dominicana entre la SE 1 y la SE 50 de 2017, se notificaron 119 casos sospechosos de cólera lo que representa una disminución de 90% comparado con lo notificado en 2016 (1.149 casos entre la SE 1 y la SE 52); situación similar con respecto al número de defunciones donde el descenso observado fue de 85%.

Haiti: Actualización epidemiológica - Cólera - 28 de diciembre de 2017

Sat, 12/30/2017 - 20:45
Source: World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization Country: Dominican Republic, Haiti

Cólera en las Américas – Resumen de la situación

En la Región de las Américas, entre las semanas epidemiológicas (SE) 1 y SE 50 de 2017 se notificaron 13.582 casos sospechosos de cólera en La Española; 99% de los cuales ocurrieron en Haití (13.468 casos; incluidas 157 defunciones).

Si bien en ambos países se observó una disminución de casos respecto a lo notificado en 2016, la República Dominicana registró la mayor variación disminuyendo de 12,8 a 1,21 casos por cien mil habitantes mientras que en Haití la variación fue de 3,74 a 1,10 casos por cien mil habitantes en 2016 y 2017, respectivamente.

En Haití, los casos notificados entre la SE 1 y la SE 50 de 2017 (13.468) representan una disminución del 68% respecto al total de casos notificados desde la SE 1 a la SE 52 de 2016 (41.421) y es el número de casos más bajo registrado desde el inicio del brote en octubre de 2010 (Figura 1).
Aún así, se notifican 200-300 casos sospechosos cada semana. En la SE 47 y la SE 50, se informaron casos sospechosos en 7 de los 10 departamentos, aunque cuatro departamentos (Artibonite, Centre, Nord Ouest y Ouest) concentraron el 90% de los casos. El promedio de casos notificados en este periodo superó a lo observado en semanas anteriores, principalmente a expensas de los departamentos Nord y Nord Ouest donde se observó un aumento de 36% y 19%, respectivamente.

De manera similar, comparativamente entre 2016 y 2017 el número de defunciones relacionadas con el cólera disminuyó en 65% (de 447 a 157 defunciones) y el número de defunciones notificados en 2017, corresponde a la cifra más baja registrada desde 2010.

En la República Dominicana entre la SE 1 y la SE 50 de 2017, se notificaron 119 casos sospechosos de cólera lo que representa una disminución de 90% comparado con lo notificado en 2016 (1.149 casos entre la SE 1 y la SE 52); situación similar con respecto al número de defunciones donde el descenso observado fue de 85%.

Haiti: Haïti : Mise à jour sur la sécurité alimentaire, décembre 2017

Sat, 12/30/2017 - 19:56
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Dominican Republic, Haiti

Faible disponibilité alimentaire locale dans le Nord-Est en raison des fortes pluies ayant affecté la production

KEY MESSAGES

  • Les diminutions de récoltes et les perturbations des moyens d’existence dues au passage de l’ouragan Irma et aux récentes averses maintiennent une bonne partie de la zone HT02 (Nord et Nord-Est) en phase 3, les autres régions étant en stress ou en situation minimale jusqu’en mai 2018, avec des zones spécifiques de la côte Sud en phase de crise durant la période de soudure.

  • Dans le Nord-Est, les averses d’octobre et de novembre ont affecté les rendements du haricot et du riz en phase de récolte, surtout dans les plaines. Les dernières pluies favorisent les préparatifs pour la saison d'hiver, mais les agriculteurs font face à des difficultés d’approvisionnement en semences et en intrants. Dans la plaine de Maribaroux, la préparation des sols est retardée, en raison d’un excès d’eau dans le sol.

  • Les précipitations de novembre favorisent néanmoins les cultures comme la banane, le pois Congo, les racines et tubercules, même au niveau de la côte Sud qui a fait face à des épisodes de sécheresse en septembre-octobre. Ces cultures ont produit des récoltes supérieures ou égales à la moyenne, particulièrement dans la Grande-Anse.

  • Les prix nominaux des produits alimentaires locaux (le maïs et le haricot noir), et des produits importés (le riz), sont en hausse.
    Ce dernier affiche une croissance moyenne de 11 pourcent, entre septembre et octobre. La tendance est maintenue en novembre mais de manière moins prononcée.

SITUATION ACTUELLE

Les conditions météorologiques : les précipitations se sont avérées très favorables, d'octobre à novembre, avec des pluies normales ou supérieures à la normale. Même le Sud, particulièrement au niveau des plaines côtières en proie à une grande sécheresse de juillet à octobre, a reçu des averses régulières en novembre.

Cependant, les analyses à long terme des déficits hydriques suggèrent que l’ile de la Gonâve et les départements de l’Ouest et des Nippes ont reçu seulement 50 à 80 pourcent des pluies moyennes.
La situation agricole : Selon une mission conjointe conduite par FEWS NET, le PAM, la CNSA et la FAO, les cultures de printemps dans le Nord-Est, qui devaient arriver à maturité en septembre, ont été perturbées par les précipitations produites par les ouragans Irma et Maria et par des insectes ravageurs, générant ainsi des récoltes en dessous de la normale.

Certaines cultures auparavant en stress hydrique, dont le maïs, ont finalement développé de bonnes récoltes issues de la campagne d'été/automne, semées en août ou septembre. Dans le Plateau Central, cette saison a coïncidé avec les récoltes de haricot, d'arachide et de pois Congo. Si les plantations de haricot ont été perdues en raison d'un excès d'humidité entrainant le pourrissement des racines, les récoltes d'arachide et de pois Congo ont été bonnes. Dans le Nord-Est, les agriculteurs ont pu lancer la campagne d'été/automne, notamment à Fort-Liberté, mais cette campagne a été affectée par les pluies entre septembre et novembre et les récoltes de maïs, de riz, de pois inconnu, d’arachide ont été faibles, à l’exception de quelques localités au sud du département. Ainsi, la campagne d'automne n'a pas eu lieu dans certaines régions, en raison d'une part, du manque de moyens et de l’indisponibilité des intrants et, d'autre part, de la saturation du sol résultant des fortes pluies et de l’obstruction des canaux d'irrigation par les alluvions.

En raison du niveau d'humidité du sol dans le Nord-Est, les agriculteurs n'ont pas pu établir de nouvelles plantations et les préparatifs pour la saison d’hiver n'ont toujours pas commencé. Présentement, des plantations de riz sont réhabilitées, contrairement à la situation observée à Ouanaminthe et à Ferrier (Nord-Est). Toutefois, elles sont menacées par la présence de certains ravageurs, en particulier des punaises. Malgré des conditions pluviométriques favorables dans d’autres zones, la disponibilité et l'accès aux semences représentent des contraintes à la pleine réussite de la campagne d’hiver.

Disponibilité alimentaire : Les cultures dont la banane, le pois Congo, les racines et les tubercules ont produit des récoltes supérieures ou égales à la moyenne, particulièrement dans la Grande-Anse, malgré les épisodes de sécheresse de septembreoctobre, ce qui a augmenté leur disponibilité sur les marchés régionaux. Dans le Plateau Central, contrairement aux haricots dont les récoltes ont été faibles à cause d’un excès d’humidité, celles de pois Congo et d’arachide approvisionnent présentement non seulement le marché régional (Hinche), mais aussi les marchés secondaires du département et de manière significative celui de la Croix-des-Bossales à Port-au-Prince. En revanche, certains marchés, (Fond des Nègres et Port-de-Paix) ont été perturbés par les pluies intenses du mois de novembre, ce qui a entrainé des délais d’approvisionnement. De plus, sur les marchés des Cayes et des Gonaïves, un accroissement de la demande de haricot a été observé au cours de cette période en raison des semis d'hiver. Par ailleurs, les marchés continuent d’être approvisionnés en produits importés.

Main d’œuvre agricole : Les préparatifs des semis d'hiver vont globalement bon train, même dans le Nord-Est (surtout dans les zones montagneuses : Mont-Organisé, Carice, Sainte Suzanne, etc.). Ces activités sont une source d’emploi importante pour les ménages pauvres qui peuvent vendre des journées de travail, dans des activités de préparation du sol et de semis. Cette source de revenu leur permettrait de se procurer des semences et d’autres intrants en préparation de la campagne de printemps 2018. Cependant, le ralentissement des travaux de préparation du sol dans certaines zones et les pertes de récoltes dans d’autres ont occasionné une diminution des revenus pour les travailleurs agricoles. Cette situation génère un exode massif de ces travailleurs vers la République Dominicaine.

Les prix des produits alimentaires : Entre octobre et en novembre, les prix des produits alimentaires, en particulier le riz importé, maintiennent leur tendance à la hausse initiée depuis le mois de septembre (11 pourcent en moyenne), tandis que celui du maïs local s'est modérément contracté. Le prix moyen du haricot noir est passé de 116,8 gourdes/kilo à près de 120 gourdes, affichant une croissance de 2,5 pourcent par rapport au mois précédent. L'augmentation du prix du haricot a été observée sur sept des dix marchés, dont celui de Hinche (8.3 pourcent), alors que le prix était relativement stable sur les marchés de Jacmel et de Ouanaminthe et a baissé de plus de 2 pourcent sur celui du Cap Haïtien.

World: Les Casques bleus ont sauvé beaucoup de vies en 2017 malgré les défis, rappelle l'ONU en cette fin d'année

Sat, 12/30/2017 - 06:15
Source: UN News Service Country: Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Liberia, Mali, South Sudan, World

29 décembre 2017 – Malgré une année particulièrement meurtrière pour les soldats de la paix des Nations Unies, avec plus de 60 Casques bleus tués dans des actes hostiles, l'ONU a réalisé en 2017 ses objectifs de maintien de la paix en Côte d'Ivoire, réorienté son travail en Haïti et achèvera bientôt son mandat au Libéria.

« Nous protégeons les civils tous les jours. Nous sauvons des vies tous les jours. Nous le faisons souvent dans des circonstances très difficiles et stressantes », a déclaré le Secrétaire général adjoint aux opérations de maintien de la paix, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, lors d'un récent entretien avec ONU Info.

Il a ajouté que « de nombreuses vies ont été sauvées » grâce aux soldats de la paix cette année en République centrafricaine, en République démocratique du Congo, au Mali, au Soudan du Sud et dans d'autres endroits.

« Je pense qu'il est plus que justifié de leur rendre hommage ainsi qu'à leurs succès », a déclaré M. Lacroix. « Mais nous devons certainement travailler dur pour surmonter les défis auxquels nous sommes confrontés ».

Les défis en 2017

L'un des défis auxquels les forces de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies doivent faire face dans des zones de plus en plus complexes et dangereuses est la nécessité d'une meilleure formation et de meilleurs équipements, en particulier pour la collecte de renseignements et la connaissance de l'environnement. Cela inclut l'utilisation de technologies modernes (drones, radars et ballons).

Selon Atul Khare, chef du Département des Nations Unies pour l'appui aux missions, l'ONU envisage d'emprunter ou d'acheter davantage d'équipements pour la sécurité, le logement, le transport et les communications.

Au Mali, par exemple, un hôpital militaire sur quatre n'a ni personnel ni équipement, et en République centrafricaine, un sur trois, a-t-il dit.

Il y a également des lacunes en termes de collaboration avec les communautés locales, ce qui signifie que dans certaines régions, il faut plus de Casques bleus qui parlent français.

« Nous devons faire encore plus pour la prévention et l'atténuation des risques lorsque nous cherchons à protéger nos collègues. Assurer la sécurité et la sûreté du personnel déployé dans des environnements volatiles est une nécessité absolue », a déclaré M. Khare à ONU Info.

Exploitation et abus sexuels

L'un des principaux défis dans les opérations de maintien de la paix est de lutter contre les allégations d'exploitation et d'abus sexuels par les forces de maintien de la paix de l'ONU.

Plus tôt cette année, le Secrétaire général António Guterres a dévoilé sa stratégie pour éradiquer ce fléau et a nommé Jane Connors au poste de première Défenseure des droits des victimes.

« Il s'agit de la dignité des victimes, de compassion, d'un réel sentiment d'empathie, du sentiment qu'elles ne sont pas oubliées », a déclaré Mme Connors début décembre lors d'une visite au Soudan du Sud. « Que leur douleur soit reconnue, et que nous fassions tout notre possible pour améliorer leur situation ».

La nouvelle stratégie de l'ONU visant à prévenir l'exploitation et les abus sexuels met davantage de pression sur les gouvernements pour qu'ils enquêtent et engagent des poursuites si cela est nécessaire. En outre, 17 pays ont versé 1,8 million de dollars à un fonds d'affectation spéciale pour aider les victimes à obtenir un soutien médical, psychosocial, juridique ou socioéconomique.

« Les informations sur les allégations arrivent avec moins d'obstacles qu'auparavant », a déclaré M. Lacroix. « Nous devons aussi faire plus pour mettre pleinement en œuvre cette politique et il faut une forte sensibilisation à tous les niveaux ».

Le maintien de la paix de l'ONU gère également d'une autre manière son impact dans les pays qui accueillent ses opérations en préservant les ressources naturelles et l'environnement pendant leur déploiement.

Les programmes visant à réduire la consommation d'énergie permettent également aux missions de gagner du temps et des ressources et de se concentrer sur la mise en œuvre de leurs principaux mandats.

Toutes les opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies ont lancé cette année des plans d'action pour l'environnement qui ont, par exemple, conduit à l'élaboration de 80 programmes de traitement des eaux usées.

Regarder vers l'avenir

Si l'année 2017 a été marquée par des réformes ambitieuses, 2018 doit être l'année de mise en œuvre de ces réformes, a déclaré M. Lacroix.

Il a noté que cela sera particulièrement important sur le terrain, où les collègues doivent être informés et habilités à agir.

Selon M. Khare, l'objectif est de « s'assurer que nous sommes plus forts en matière de prévention, plus agiles en termes de médiation et plus souples, plus efficaces et plus rentables dans nos opérations ».

Il a souligné la nécessité de renforcer la collaboration avec les États membres et les organisations régionales pour mieux servir les personnes les plus vulnérables dans le monde.

« Nous ferons de notre mieux pour mettre en œuvre avec succès ces réformes et nous ferons certainement de notre mieux pour appuyer nos collègues sur le terrain », a déclaré M. Lacroix.

World: Peacekeepers saved many lives despite challenges, UN officials stress at year's end

Fri, 12/29/2017 - 17:26
Source: UN News Service Country: Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Liberia, Mali, South Sudan, World

29 December 2017 – Despite a particularly deadly year for United Nations peacekeepers – with more than 60 'blue helmets' killed in hostile acts – the Organization in 2017 completed its peacekeeping objectives in Côte d'Ivoire, refocused its work in Haiti and will soon complete its mandate in Liberia.

“We do protect civilians every day. We do save lives every day. We often do it under very difficult and stressful circumstances,” Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations Jean-Pierre Lacroix said in a recent interview with UN News.

He added that “many lives were saved” because of peacekeepers' actions this year in the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, South Sudan and other places.

“I think it's more than warranted to pay tribute to them and their achievements,” Mr. Lacroix said. “But certainly we have to work hard to overcome the challenges we are facing.”

Challenges in 2017

One of the challenges facing UN peacekeepers, as they operate in increasingly complex and dangerous areas, is the need for better training and equipment, particularly when it comes to intelligence gathering and enhancing situational awareness.

This includes the use of modern technologies, such as unmanned aerial services, radars and tethered balloons.

The head of the UN Department of Field Support, Atul Khare, said the UN is also looking to borrow or purchase more equipment related to security reinforcements, accommodations, vehicles and communications tools, among others.

In Mali, for example, one out of four military hospitals is without staff or equipment, and in the Central African Republic, one in three, he said.

The needs also extend to gaps in working closely with local communities, which means that in some areas more peacekeepers are needed who speak French.

“We must do even more on the side of prevention and risk mitigation when seeking to protect our colleagues. Providing for the safety and security of deployed personnel in volatile environments is an absolute necessity,” Mr. Khare told UN News.

Sexual exploitation and abuse

One of the main challenges in peacekeeping operations has been grappling with allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers.

Earlier this year, Secretary-General António Guterres unveiled his strategy for eradicating the scourge, and appointed Jane Connors as the first Victims' Rights Advocate.

“It is about dignity for the victims, compassion, a real feeling of empathy, a feeling that they are not forgotten,” Ms. Connors said in early December. “That their hurt, their pain is acknowledged, and we do as much as we possibly can do to make their situation better.”

Ms. Connors made the comments during a visit to South Sudan, where four of last year's 103 allegations were filed. This year, the UN recorded 54 allegations – roughly half the number.

“This is a result of the many robust efforts put in place to train our personnel, raise awareness among communities on the risks associated with SEA [sexual exploitation and abuse], promote and enforce the zero-tolerance policy and partner with Member States,” said Mr. Khare.

The new UN strategy to prevent sexual exploitation and abuse puts more pressure on governments to investigate and prosecute wrong-doing. In addition, 17 countries volunteered some $1.8 million for a trust fund to aid victims get medical, psycho-social, legal or socio-economic support.

“We can see that information about allegations are coming more with less obstacle than before,” Mr. Lacroix said. “At the same time, we need to do more to fully implement the policy and it has to have strong awareness at every level.”

Protecting the environment

UN peacekeeping is also managing its impact in another way within the countries that host its operations – by preserving natural resources and not damaging the environment during the physical deployments.

“'Do no harm' must include both communities and the resources upon which they depend: water, land, cultural heritage,” Mr. Khare said.

Plans to reduce the peacekeeping footprint and energy consumption also saves time and resources, allowing peacekeeping missions to focus on implementing their core mandates.

All UN peacekeeping operations this year launched Environmental Action Plans which have, for example, led to 80 wastewater treatment plans being installed in peacekeeping operations.

“We are constantly looking into keeping our own house in order, and leave the place better than we found it,” said Mr. Khare.

Looking ahead to 2018

If the year 2017 brought ambitious reform, then 2018 must be the year that these reforms are implemented, Mr. Lacroix said.

He noted that this will be particularly important in the field, where colleagues must be informed and empowered to act.

Mr. Khare echoed the idea that reforms are ongoing, noting that the goal is to “ensure that we are stronger in prevention, more agile in mediation, and more nimble, efficient and cost-effective in our operations.”

He pointed to improved efficiency and effectiveness of peacekeeping, including also by strengthening engagement with Member States and regional organizations to better serve the most vulnerable people around the world.

“We approach 2018 with a sense of hope. We will do our best to successfully implement these reforms and certainly we will do our best to support our colleagues in the field,” said Mr. Lacroix.

World: Global Price Watch: November 2017 Prices (December 28, 2017)

Fri, 12/29/2017 - 08:05
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Chad, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

KEY MESSAGES

  • In West Africa, regional staple food production for the 2017/18 marketing year is projected to be above average, increasing for the fourth consecutive year. Locally-produced grain prices declined seasonally in November as post-harvest sales and trade flows intensified. Staple food prices remained above average across much of the region. Below average pastoral conditions continue to influence livestock markets in many areas. Market anomalies remain concentrated in the eastern marketing basin, including but not limited to conflict-related market disruptions in the Lake Chad basin, and trade disruptions related to the depreciation of the Naira, and various government measures in Nigeria.

  • In East Africa, staple food prices remained above average but were seasonally declining in most of the region with supplies from recent harvests or the imminent start of a harvest. Sorghum prices atypically increased in Sudan and Ethiopia due to delayed harvests. Markets remain severely disrupted by insecurity and significant macro-economic issues in Yemen and South Sudan. Food commodity prices continued to increase in Yemen due to the blockade by the Saudi Coalition in addition to currency depreciation and conflict related trade disruptions. Livestock prices were mixed depending on seasonal availability of pasture and water.

  • In Southern Africa, maize supplies across the region were at above-average levels due to above-average domestic supplies. Exportable maize surpluses are high in South Africa and Zambia to satisfy regional and international demand.
    South Africa exported to Japan and Kenya, while Zambia exported to Burundi, Kenya and Rwanda. Maize prices were generally atypically stable across reference markets and levels were significantly below average.

  • In Central America, staple food availability remained high with supplies from the recent Primera harvest and the start of the Postrera harvest, which are estimated to be average to above-average. Maize and bean prices were generally seasonally stable and near or below average levels, except in Nicaragua where bean prices increased atypically and were above average. In Haiti, maize prices decreased slightly as more supplies from the été harvest entered the market, while black bean and imported rice prices were stable. Higher demand during the festive period is expected to place upward pressure on December prices for staples such as rice, pigeon peas, and red beans.

  • In Central Asia, regional availability and price trends varied considerably. However, regional wheat deficits are expected to be filled through intra-regional trade.
    Wheat grain and flour prices have remained stable but trends vary by country.

  • International staple food markets remain well supplied. Rice prices rose slightly while maize, wheat and soybean prices were mostly stable in November 2017. Crude oil prices rose for the fourth consecutive month and are currently at their highest levels in more than two years.

World: Price Watch November 2017 Prices December 28, 2017

Fri, 12/29/2017 - 08:05
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Chad, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

KEY MESSAGES

  • In West Africa, regional staple food production for the 2017/18 marketing year is projected to be above average, increasing for the fourth consecutive year. Locally-produced grain prices declined seasonally in November as post-harvest sales and trade flows intensified. Staple food prices remained above average across much of the region. Below average pastoral conditions continue to influence livestock markets in many areas. Market anomalies remain concentrated in the eastern marketing basin, including but not limited to conflict-related market disruptions in the Lake Chad basin, and trade disruptions related to the depreciation of the Naira, and various government measures in Nigeria.

  • In East Africa, staple food prices remained above average but were seasonally declining in most of the region with supplies from recent harvests or the imminent start of a harvest. Sorghum prices atypically increased in Sudan and Ethiopia due to delayed harvests. Markets remain severely disrupted by insecurity and significant macro-economic issues in Yemen and South Sudan. Food commodity prices continued to increase in Yemen due to the blockade by the Saudi Coalition in addition to currency depreciation and conflict related trade disruptions. Livestock prices were mixed depending on seasonal availability of pasture and water.

  • In Southern Africa, maize supplies across the region were at above-average levels due to above-average domestic supplies. Exportable maize surpluses are high in South Africa and Zambia to satisfy regional and international demand.
    South Africa exported to Japan and Kenya, while Zambia exported to Burundi, Kenya and Rwanda. Maize prices were generally atypically stable across reference markets and levels were significantly below average.

  • In Central America, staple food availability remained high with supplies from the recent Primera harvest and the start of the Postrera harvest, which are estimated to be average to above-average. Maize and bean prices were generally seasonally stable and near or below average levels, except in Nicaragua where bean prices increased atypically and were above average. In Haiti, maize prices decreased slightly as more supplies from the été harvest entered the market, while black bean and imported rice prices were stable. Higher demand during the festive period is expected to place upward pressure on December prices for staples such as rice, pigeon peas, and red beans.

  • In Central Asia, regional availability and price trends varied considerably. However, regional wheat deficits are expected to be filled through intra-regional trade.
    Wheat grain and flour prices have remained stable but trends vary by country.

  • International staple food markets remain well supplied. Rice prices rose slightly while maize, wheat and soybean prices were mostly stable in November 2017. Crude oil prices rose for the fourth consecutive month and are currently at their highest levels in more than two years.

Haiti: Epidemiological Update - Cholera - 28 December 2017

Fri, 12/29/2017 - 00:35
Source: World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization Country: Dominican Republic, Haiti

Cholera in the Americas - Situation summary

In the Americas Region, between epidemiological week (EW) 1 and EW 50 of 2017, a total of 13,582 suspected cholera cases were reported on the island of Hispaniola, of which 99% occurred in Haiti (13,468 cases, including 157 deaths). 1 During the same period, 62 suspected cholera cases were reported in the Dominican Republic, including two deaths.

Both the Dominican Republic and Haiti reported a decrease in cases in relation to 2016. However, the decrease in Dominican Republic is greater with 12.8 to 1.21 cases per hundred thousand inhabitants in 2016 and 2017 respectively, while in Haiti reported cases dropped from 3.74 to 1.10 cases per hundred thousand inhabitants.

In Haiti, the cases reported between EW 1 and EW 50 of 2017 (13,468) represent a decrease of 68% with respect to the cases notified since EW 1 and EW 52 of 2016 (41,421) and is the lowest reported cases since the outbreak started in Haiti in October 2010 (Figure 1). Nevertheless, there are still 200–300 suspected cases reported each week. Between EW 47 and EW 50 of 2017, suspected cases were reported in 9 of the 10 Departments, although four Departments (Artibonite, Centre, Nord-Ouest and Ouest) account for 90% of the cases. In the same period, the average number of cases reported exceeded what was reported in the preceding weeks, mainly with the increases observed in the Nord (36% increase) and Nord-Ouest (19% increase) departments.

Similarly and comparatively between 2016 and 2017 the number of deaths reported decreased by 65% (from 447 to 157 deaths) and represents the lowest number of deaths reported since 2010.

In the Dominican Republic, between EW 1 and EW 50 of 2017, a total of 119 suspected cholera cases were reported representing a 90% decrease compared to cases reported in 2016 (1,149 between EW 1 and EW 52); this decrease is similarly observed with respect to deaths reported, there was an 85% decrease in 2017 compared to those reported in 2016.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: December 29 - January 4, 2018

Wed, 12/27/2017 - 18:55
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Panama, Somalia, Swaziland, Tajikistan, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Drought worsens across Zimbabwe, southern Mozambique and northern South Africa

  1. An early end to seasonal rainfall has caused a drought in eastern Kenya and southern Somalia. Seasonal moisture deficits have strengthened across several bimodal areas of Tanzania during December.

  2. While east-central South Africa has benefited aboveaverage rain since late November, northern and westcentral areas of the country report moderate to large moisture deficits over the past 30 days.

  3. Although rainfall totals have improved in some areas of southern Madagascar since mid-November, negative vegetation conditions are recorded in many areas. A decline in seasonal rainfall has been recorded in several western provinces of the island.

  4. Below-average rain during the past month has resulted in large moisture deficits and below-average vegetation conditions over northwestern Angola.

  5. Below-average rainfall during December has resulted in early season moisture deficits across southern Mozambique and in several parts of Zimbabwe. The continuation of poor rainfall during January is likely.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: December 15 - 21, 2017

Wed, 12/27/2017 - 18:44
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Somalia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Poor rainfall performance leads to drought in eastern Kenya and southern Somalia

  1. Below-average rainfall has increased moisture deficits and resulted in a drought in eastern Kenya and southern Somalia. With the October-December rainfall season ending, the chance for recovery is very unlikely.

  2. While east-central South Africa has benefited aboveaverage rain since late November, northern and westcentral areas of the country report moderate to large moisture deficits over the past thirty days.

  3. Although rainfall totals have improved in some areas of southern Madagascar since mid-November, negative vegetation conditions are recorded in many areas.

  4. Below-average rain during the past month has resulted in large moisture deficits and below-average vegetation conditions over northwestern Angola. The forecast light rain next week may not be sufficient to offset deficits.

  5. Above-average rain over the past three weeks has caused flooding in central Madagascar. Continued rain is forecast to continue next week, maintaining high risks for flooding.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: December 22 - 28, 2017

Wed, 12/27/2017 - 18:41
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Comoros, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Panama, Somalia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tajikistan, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Poorly distributed rainfall contributes to ongoing moisture deficits in Southern Africa

  1. Below-average rainfall has increased moisture deficits and resulted in a drought in eastern Kenya and southern Somalia. With the October-December rainfall season ending, the chance for recovery is very unlikely.

  2. While east-central South Africa has benefited aboveaverage rain since late November, northern and westcentral areas of the country report moderate to large moisture deficits over the past thirty days.

  3. Although rainfall totals have improved in some areas of southern Madagascar since mid-November, negative vegetation conditions are recorded in many areas.

  4. Below-average rain during the past month has resulted in large moisture deficits and below-average vegetation conditions over northwestern Angola. The forecast light rain next week may not be sufficient to offset deficits.

  5. Heavy rain during the past week has caused flooding in the Lilongwe, Malawi. Above-average rain is forecast to continue next week, maintaining high risk for flooding

Haiti: Haïti : Présence physique - où ils ont les bureaux (en date du 22 décembre 2017)

Sat, 12/23/2017 - 02:46
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Haiti

Haiti: Haiti: Physical presence - where humanitarian partners have offices (as of 22 December 2017)

Sat, 12/23/2017 - 02:42
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Haiti

Honduras: Honduras: Population Movement DREF Final Report (MDRHN010)

Fri, 12/22/2017 - 17:56
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Angola, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Honduras, India, Kenya, Nepal, Senegal

A. Situation Analysis

Description of the Disaster

• November 2015: The authorities at the National Migration Institute (INM for its acronym in Spanish) estimated that around 20,000 people – of mainly Cuban origin – passed through the region in 2014 and 2015.

• August 2016: The INM’s Regional Office and the Centre for Assistance to Irregular Migrants (CAMI for its acronym in Spanish) received requests for assistance from an average of 2,500 migrants per month.

• September 2016: The Honduran Red Cross signed a letter of understanding with the INM to coordinate the humanitarian response actions following the emergency that affected irregular migrants.

• October 2016: The HRC began implementing the Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) operation:
The HRC provided services to around 5,500 migrants, thereby exceeding the original target population of 4,000 migrants; the services included basic first aid care, the distribution of personal hygiene kits and key messages to promote hygiene as well as a restoring family links (RFL), which was jointly implemented with the ICRC, so that people could contact their families through the provision of a free telephone call. The migrants were mainly of Caribbean origin from countries such as Haiti and Cuba, while a smaller percentage of migrants were from the continent of Africa, including the Democratic Republic of Congo, Cameroon, Senegal, Angola, Kenya as well as Asian countries such as Bangladesh, Nepal, India, among others.

The situation at the CAMI evolved in terms of the number of migrants entering the country, ending with a low level of migrants at the close of the operations. In January and February 2017, less than 1,200 migrants were received, meaning that the administrative process was faster. In addition, there was less demand for the HRC’s services; however, there was high demand for first aid care, which was received positively by the migrants.

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